Delve deeper into Android development with our new course!

Delve deeper into Android development with our new course!

Posted by Jocelyn Becker, Senior Program Manager, Google Developer Training

If you know the basics of building Android apps and want to delve deeper, take a
look at our new Advanced
Android Development
course built by the Google Developers Training team.

Do you want to learn how to use fragments, add widgets for your app, and fine
tune your app’s performance? Make your app available to a diverse user base
through localization and accessibility features? Use sensors in your app? How
about creating custom views, drawing directly to the screen and running
animations?

Each lesson in our new course takes you through building an app that illustrates
an advanced concept, from incorporating maps into your app to using a
SurfaceView to draw outside the main UI thread.

This course is intended for experienced Java programmers who already know the
fundamentals of building Android apps. It is a follow-on course to our Android
Developer Fundamentals
course. The course is intended to be taught as
instructor-led training. However, all the materials are published online and are
available to anyone who wants to learn more advanced concepts of Android
development.

We have published detailed written tutorials,
concept
guides
, slide decks, and most importantly, a treasure trove of apps in
GitHub
. You can find links to everything at developers.google.com/training/android-advanced.

Educational institutions worldwide are invited to use this course to teach your
students. Individual developers are welcome (and encouraged) to work through the
tutorials to learn on their own.

Each lesson presents a different, advanced topic, and you can teach or learn
each topic independently of the others.

Build apps as you learn how to use sensors, add places to your app, and draw
directly to a canvas. And much more!

The new course covers:

  • using fragments
  • building widgets
  • using sensors
  • measuring and improving application performance
  • localizing your app
  • making your app accessible
  • adding location, places and maps to your apps
  • creating custom views
  • drawing to the canvas
  • drawing to a SurfaceView off the main thread
  • running animations

Learn more at developers.google.com/training/android-advanced.

The Mythical UX Designer – Five Common Misconceptions

The Mythical UX Designer – Five Common Misconceptions

Exploring the truth about the type of people who do UX. Ah, the UX designer. A mythical figure in high demand these days. Sought after for their skills in empathizing with customers, designing digital products that people love, and their peculiar love of collaboration. Their natural habitat is anywhere there are interfaces to problem solve […]

Final preview of Android 8.1 now available

Final preview of Android 8.1 now available

Posted by Dave Burke, VP of Engineering

Starting today we’re rolling out an update to the Android 8.1 developer preview,
the last before the official launch to consumers in December. Android 8.1 adds
targeted enhancements to the Oreo platform, including optimizations for
Android Go (for devices with 1GB or less of memory) and a
Neural Networks API to accelerate on-device machine
intelligence. We’ve also included a few smaller enhancements to Oreo in response
to user and developer feedback.

If you have a device enrolled in the Android Beta Program, you’ll receive the
update over the next few days. If you haven’t enrolled yet, just visit the Android Beta site to enroll and get the
update.

At the official release in December we’ll bring Android 8.1 to all supported
Pixel and Nexus devices worldwide — including Pixel 2 and Pixel 2
XL
, Pixel, Pixel XL, Pixel C, Nexus 5X, and Nexus 6P. Watch for
announcements soon.

What’s in this update?

This preview update includes near-final Android 8.1 system images for Pixel and
Nexus devices, with official APIs (API level 27), the latest optimizations and
bug fixes, and the November 2017 security patch updates. You can use the images
for compatibility testing or to develop using new Android 8.1 features like the
Neural
Networks API
and others.

The Neural Networks API provides accelerated computation and inference for
on-device machine learning frameworks like TensorFlow Lite — Google’s
cross-platform ML library for mobile — as well as Caffe2 and others. TensorFlow
Lite is now
available to developers
, so visit the TensorFlow
Lite open source repo
for downloads and docs. TensorFlow Lite works with the
Neural Networks API to run models like MobileNets,
Inception v3, and Smart
Reply
efficiently on your mobile device.

Also, for Pixel 2 users, the Android 8.1 update on these devices enables Pixel
Visual Core
— Google’s first custom-designed co-processor for image
processing and ML — through a new developer option. Once enabled, apps using
Android Camera API can capture HDR+ shots through Pixel Visual Core. See the release
notes
for details.

Get your apps ready

With the consumer launch coming in December, it’s
important to test your current app now. This ensures that users transition
seamlessly to Android 8.1 when it arrives on their devices.

Just enroll your eligible device in Android Beta to get the latest update,
then install your app from Google Play and test. If you don’t have a Pixel or
Nexus device, you can set up an Android 8.1 emulator for testing instead. If you
notice any issues, fix them and update your app in Google Play right away —
without changing the app’s platform targeting.

When you’re ready, take advantage of new features and APIs in Android 8.1. See
the developer
preview site
, the API 27 diff
report
, and the updated
API reference
for details.

Speed your development with Android Studio

To build with Android 8.1, we recommend updating to Android
Studio 3.0
, which is now available from the stable
channel
. On top of the new app performance
profiling tools
, support for the Kotlin
programming language
, and Gradle build optimizations, Android Studio 3.0
makes it easier to develop with Android Oreo features like Instant
Apps
, XML
Fonts
, downloadable
fonts
, and adaptive
icons
.

We also recommend updating to the Android
Support Library 27.0.0
, which is available from Google’s
Maven repository
. See the version
notes
for details on what’s new.

Publish your updates to Google Play

Google Play is open for apps compiled against or targeting API 27. When you’re
ready, you can publish your APK updates in your alpha, beta, or production
channels.

To make sure your app runs well on Android 8.1 as well as older versions, we
recommend using Google Play’s beta
testing feature
to run an alpha test on small group of users. Then run a
much open beta test on a much larger group of users. When you’re ready to launch
your update, you can use a staged
rollout
in your production channel. We’re looking forward to seeing your app
updates!

Give us your feedback

As always, your feedback is crucial, so please keep it coming!.
We’ve set up different hotlists where you can report Android
platform issues
, app
compatibility issues
, and third-party
SDKs and tools issues
. We also have a dedicated hotlist for Neural
Networks API issues
.

You can also give us feedback through the Android
Developer community
or Android Beta
community
as we work towards the consumer release in December.

Getting Our Community Help in Real Time

Getting Our Community Help in Real Time

By Guy Rosen, VP of Product Management When someone is expressing thoughts of suicide, it’s important to get them help as quickly as possible. Facebook is a place where friends and family are already connected and we are able to help connect a person in distress with people who can support them. It’s part of […]

Posted in Uncategorized