Quick Boot & the Top Features in the Android Emulator

Quick Boot & the Top Features in the Android Emulator

Posted by Jamal Eason, Product Manager, Android

Today, we are excited to announce Quick Boot for the Android Emulator. With
Quick Boot, you can launch the Android Emulator in under 6 seconds. Quick Boot
works by snapshotting an emulator session so you can reload in seconds. Quick
Boot was first released with Android Studio 3.0 in the canary update channel and
we are excited to release the feature as a stable update today.

In addition to this new feature, we also wanted to highlight some of the top
features from recent releases. Since the complete revamp of the Android Emulator
two
years ago
, we continue to focus on improving speed, stability and adding a
rich set of features that accelerate your app development and testing. With all
the recent changes, it is definitely worth updating to the latest version of the
Android Emulator to use it today.

Top 5 Features

  • Quick Boot – Released as a stable feature today, Quick Boot
    allows you to resume your Android Emulator session in under 6 seconds. The first
    time you start an Android Virtual Device (AVD) with the Android Emulator, it
    must perform a cold boot (just like powering on a device), but subsequent starts
    are fast and the system is restored to the state at which you closed the
    emulator last (similar to waking a device). We accomplished this by completely
    re-engineering the legacy emulator snapshot architecture to work with virtual
    sensors and GPU acceleration. No additional setup is required because Quick Boot
    is enabled by default starting with Android Emulator v27.0.2.

Quick Boot in the Android Emulator

  • Android CTS Compatibility With each
    release of the Android SDK, we ensure that the Android Emulator is ready for
    your app development needs, from testing backwards compatibility with Android
    KitKat to integrating the latest APIs of the developer preview. To increase
    product quality and reliability of emulator system images, we now qualify final
    Android System Image builds from Android Nougat (API 24) and higher against the
    Android Compatibility Test
    Suite
    (CTS)—the same testing suite that official Android physical devices
    must pass.
  • Google Play Support We know that many
    app developers use Google Play Services, and it can be difficult to keep the
    service up to date in the Android Emulator system images. To solve this problem,
    we now offer versions of Android System Images that include the Play Store app.
    The Google Play images are available starting with Android Nougat (API 24). With
    these new emulator images, you can update Google Play Services via the Play
    Store app in your emulator just as you would on a physical Android device. Plus,
    you can now test end-to-end install, update, and purchase flows with the Google
    Play Store.
  • Performance Improvements Making the
    emulator fast and performant is an on-going goal for our team. We continuously
    look at the performance impact of running the emulator on your development
    machine, especially RAM usage. With the latest versions of the Android Emulator,
    we now allocate RAM on demand, instead of allocating and pinning the memory to
    the max RAM size defined in your AVD. We do this by tapping into the native
    hypervisors for Linux (KVM) and macOS® (Hypervisor.Framework), and an
    enhanced Intel® HAXM (v6.2.1 and higher) for Microsoft®
    Windows®, which uses the new on-demand memory allocation.
  • Additionally, over the last several releases, we have improved CPU and I/O
    performance while enhancing GPU performance, including OpenGL ES 3.0 support.
    Looking at a common task such as ADB push highlights the improvements in the
    Android CPU and I/O pipelines:

    ADB Push Speed Comparison with Android Emulator

    For GPU performance, we created a sample GPU emulation stress
    test app
    to gauge improvements over time. We found that the latest emulator
    can render higher frame rates than before, and it is one of the few emulators
    that can render OpenGL ES 3.0 accurately per the Android specification.

GPU Emulation Stress Test – Android App

GPU Emulation Stress Test with Android Emulator

More Features

In addition to these major features, there are a whole host of additional
features that we have added to the Android Emulator over the last year that you
may not be aware of:

  • Wi-Fi support – Starting with API 24 system images, you can
    create an AVD that both connects to a virtual cellular network and a virtual
    Wi-Fi Access Point.
  • Google Cast support – When using a Google Play system
    image, you can cast screen and audio content to Chromecast devices on the same
    Wi-Fi network.
  • Drag and drop APKs & files – Simply drag an APK onto the
    Android Emulator window to trigger an app install. Also you can drag any other
    data file and find it in the /Downloads folder in your Android Virtual Device.
  • Host copy & paste – You can copy & paste text between the
    Android Emulator and your development machine.
  • Virtual 2-finger pinch & zoom – When interacting with apps
    like Google Maps, hold down the Ctrl Key (on Microsoft®
    Windows® or Linux) or ⌘ (on macOS® ) , and a finger
    overlay appears on screen to aid with pinch & zoom actions.
  • GPS location – Manually select a GPS point or set of GPS
    points under the Location tab of the Android Emulator.
  • Virtual sensors – There is a dedicated page in the extended
    controls panel that has supported sensors in the Android Emulator including
    acceleration, rotation, proximity and many more.
  • WebCam support – You can use a webcam or your laptop
    built-in webcam as a virtual camera in the AVD. Validate your AVD camera
    settings in the Advanced Settings page in the AVD Manager.
  • Host machine keyboard – You can use your real keyboard to
    enter text into the Android Virtual Device.
  • Virtual SMS and phone calls – In the extended controls
    panel, you can trigger a virtual SMS or phone call to test apps with telephony
    dependencies.
  • Screen zooming – On the main toolbar, click on the magnify
    glass icon to enter zoom mode, and then select a region of the screen you want
    to inspect.
  • Window resizing – Simply drag a corner of the Android
    Emulator window to change to the desired size.
  • Network proxy support – Add a custom HTTP proxy for your
    Android Emulator session by going to the Settings page under the Proxy tab.
  • Bug reporting – You can quickly generate a bug report for
    your app by using the Bug Report section in the extended controls panel to share
    with your team or to send feedback to Google.

Learn more about the Android Emulator in the Emulator
documentation
.

Getting Started

All of these features and improvements are available to download and use now
with Android Emulator v27.0.2+, which you can get via the SDK Manager in Android
Studio. For a fast experience, we recommend creating and running the x86 version
of emulator system images, with the latest Android Emulator, Intel® HAXM (if
applicable) and graphics drivers installed.

We appreciate any feedback on things you like, issues or features you would like
to see. If you find a bug, issue, or have a feature request feel free to file
an issue
. We are definitely not done, but we hope you are excited about the
improvements so far.

Digital Coaches help Black and Latino businesses grow online

Digital Coaches help Black and Latino businesses grow online

Editor’s Note: Today’s guest post comes from JinJa Birkenbeuel, the CEO of Birk Creative, a creative marketing and branding agency.

For the last six months, I’ve been one of eight minority small business owners around the U.S. piloting Google’s Digital Coach program, which offers free workshops for small businesses on how to use Google’s tools for digital marketing. We’re focusing this pilot in cities with historically large communities of Black and Latino small business owners: Atlanta, Austin, Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, and Washington, D.C.

IMG_5866.JPG

I run a creative agency in Chicago called Birk Creative, which I founded in 1997 as a graphic design and print shop–and a way to promote the country/hip-hop band, Utah Carol, that I formed with my husband, Grant. Over the last 20 years, I’ve grown the business to advise other small businesses–and now large corporate clients—on all forms of digital marketing, from designing web sites and online ads to writing social media posts to IT support. With the help of AdWords and Google Analytics in particular, I’ve expanded from a local shop to a full-service agency.

I’ve long wanted to share what I’ve learned over the years with other minority and women business owners. As a Digital Coach, I offer free, open-to-the-public digital marketing lessons (including tutorials from Google’s Get Your Business Online program) and share my own experience on how AdWords, Analytics and other Google tools have helped me solve business challenges.  

Data shows that the total number of Black, Latino, and other minority-owned businesses is growing, and that U.S. Latino small businesses are growing at higher rates than any other U.S. small businesses. Yet Black and Latino-owned businesses are less likely to have websites and less likely to be online than other groups. Our goal with these pilot workshops is to help small businesses like mine participate more fully in the digital economy as they grow.

Since Google launched the pilot in late May, we’ve welcomed more than 5,000 business founders and owners to our Digital Coach workshops around the U.S. We host these events at locations that are familiar to our communities, from the Watts Public Library in Los Angeles to beauty salons in Detroit.

I’ve coached a variety of business owners, including a nail artist, a life coach, a children’s book author and a photo-booth rental company. And there’s one thing they have in common: They’re small, independent businesses or sole proprietorships in Black and Latino communities, all at the point in their growth when they know they can be doing more.

As my Los Angeles Digital Coaches colleague Roberto Martinez says, “Working as a Coach has been transformational. We’re not just presenting or teaching; we are working in tandem with the business owners to better understand how to get ahead of the market.” 

  • hlk_google-fiber-small-business-week_002.jpg

    Program attendees and Googlers at an Austin Coaches program. Austin Digital Coach Vicky Sepulveda is at far right.

  • Screen Shot 2017-12-05 at 9.08.08 AM.png

    Coaches at Google campus in Mountain View, with pilot program leaders. Back row, left to right: Chris Genteel, Google’s Head of Business & Community Inclusion; Coaches JinJa Birkenbeuel, Shelly Bell, Vicente Pimienta, Roberto Martinez; Front row, left to right, Akiva Lewis, Google’s Customer Diversity Lead; Coaches Vicky Sepulveda and Katrina Turnbow; Google Digital Coaches pilot program managers Aisha Taylor and Nicole Herrera; and Coaches Angelina Darrisaw and Justin Dawkins

  • y
    JinJa with children’s book author Valerie Reynolds at  Digital Coaches workshop in Chicago.

After six months of meeting so many business owners from a variety of backgrounds (beyond Black and Latino) at my Digital Coach workshops, I’m inspired by them. Though they come to the Digital Coaching workshops to learn from us, our communities across the U.S. are benefiting from their contributions and expertise. As a Digital Coach, I’m honored to be playing a small part to help their businesses grow, so that all of our vibrant neighborhoods can grow, too.

If you’re interested in finding a workshop near you and to participate in our ongoing pilot in 2018, please visit https://accelerate.withgoogle.com/coaches


(Photo credit for image at top: Steve Capers Photography)

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