Blog
Data Center

Once again, Proud to Be First – IoT Performance

Over the past three decades, industry standard bodies like the TPC and SPEC have developed several standards for performance benchmarking. These standards have been a significant driving force behind the development of faster, less expensive, and more energy efficient systems. The two most influential database benchmark standards have been: TPC-C, the industry standard for benchmarking transaction processing systems, and TPC-D and its […]

Read More
Cisco Partners

Customer Success: Your Most Powerful Weapon in the Battle for Customer Retention

As part of my more than 20 years with Cisco, my family and I were fortunate to spend three years on assignment in Singapore. When we relocated back to the U.S. in 2016, we had an immediate need to purchase two cars. Without a specific vehicle preference in mind, we relied heavily on the recommendation […]

Read More
app attribution

Google Play Referrer API: Track and measure your app installs easily and securely

Posted by Neto Marin, Developer Advocate

Understanding how people find your app and what they do once they’ve installed
it is crucial to helping you make the right product and marketing decisions.
This is especially important when you’re deciding your advertising strategy and
budget. Today many app measurement companies and ad networks offer ad
attribution solutions based on referral data. As such accurate install referral
data is vital for correctly attributing app installs, as well as discounting
fraudulent attempts for install credit.

To help you obtain more accurate and reliable data about your installs, we’re
introducing the Google Play Install Referrer API, a reliable
way to securely retrieve install referral content. Using this API, your app will
get precise information straight from the Play Store, including:

  • The referrer URL of the installed package.
  • The timestamp, in seconds, of when the referrer click happened.
  • The timestamp, in seconds, of when the installation began.

We’ve tested the API with our App Attribution
Program
partners including Adjust,
AppsFlyer, Singular and TUNE.

“The new Play API provides us with the data we need to effectively detect
and prevent click injection; it’s a monumental step in securing a crucial
information exchange on Android.”

– Paul Müller, CTO & Co-Founder, Adjust

“The new Google Play API introduces fresh insights into both mobile ad fraud
and the mobile user journey, two key domains with impact across the ecosystem.”

– Elad Mashiach, VP, AppsFlyer

“This additional data directly from the Play Store provides increased precision for the Kochava fraud suite to further minimize fraud for our customers.”

– Charles Manning, CEO, Kochava

“Google’s new API is a game changer that will help marketing analytics
platforms like Singular identify and prevent a significant portion of Ad Fraud,
and provide security and accuracy to mobile advertisers”

– Gadi Eliashiv, CEO &
Co-Founder, Singular

“This new data from Google Play is essential for marketers who demand
accountability out of their mobile app install advertising spend. At TUNE, this
data is allowing us to outright eliminate entire forms of mobile app install
fraud while providing new insight into how mobile app installs are driven.”

– Dan Koch, Chief Technical Officer, TUNE

Starting today, the API works with the Play Store app from version
8.3.73 and later for all developers.

Play Install Referrer Library 1.0 now available

To make it easy to integrate the Install Referrer API, we’ve released the
Install Referrer Library 1.0 for Android. The library is available in our Maven
repository. To start using it, add the following dependency to your app module
build.gradle file:

dependencies {
          ...
          compile 'com.android.installreferrer:installreferrer:1.0'
      }

All communication with the Play Store app happens through a Service, so the
first step is to establish the connection between your app and the Play Store.
Also, to receive the connection result and updates it’s necessary to implement a
listener, InstallReferrerStateListener. This listener could be your
current Activity or any other class you want to use:

public class MainActivity extends AppCompatActivity 
    implements InstallReferrerStateListener {
    …
}

Now that you have an InstallReferrerStateListener, you can start
binding your app to the Play Store app service. To establish the connection, you
must build an InstallReferrerClient instance and call the
startConnection() method:

InstallReferrerClient mReferrerClient
...
mReferrerClient = newBuilder(this).build();
mReferrerClient.startConnection(this);

Then, handle the connection result in the
onInstallReferrerSetupFinished() method. If the connection is OK,
the app can retrieve install referrer information, by calling the
getInstallReferrer() method:

@Override
public void onInstallReferrerSetupFinished(int responseCode) {
   switch (responseCode) {
       case InstallReferrerResponse.OK:
           try {
               Log.v(TAG, "InstallReferrer conneceted");
               ReferrerDetails response = mReferrerClient.getInstallReferrer();
               handleReferrer(response);
               mReferrerClient.endConnection();
           } catch (RemoteException e) {
               e.printStackTrace();
           }
           break;
       case InstallReferrerResponse.FEATURE_NOT_SUPPORTED:
           Log.w(TAG, "InstallReferrer not supported");
           break;
       case InstallReferrerResponse.SERVICE_UNAVAILABLE:
           Log.w(TAG, "Unable to connect to the service");
           break;
       default:
           Log.w(TAG, "responseCode not found.");
   }
}

For more details about the new API and the client library, visit the Install
Referrer Client Library page
and the reference
documentation
.

Other Implementations

If you are not able to use our client library, you can use the AIDL interface
and establish the connection with Google Play Store on your own. Check out the
IGetInstallReferrerService
AIDL reference
for details of the methods and the service
specification.

What’s next?

Check out the Play
Install Referrer API documentation
for details about the new API, the library’s
reference docs
, and our Quick
Start guide
.

Read More
Google AR and VR

Experimenting with VR at the South China Morning Post

Having spent my pre-Google career as a reporter and editor at legacy media organizations, I can tell you that digital transformation in the news industry is challenging. Even when news organizations have the will, resources and technical expertise, the obstacles to transformation can be daunting.

In Asia, few news organization have plunged headlong into digital transformation like South China Morning Post, Hong Kong’s top English-language daily newspaper. With a daily weekday circulation of roughly 105K, SCMP is a midsize paper, but its language and geography give it outsized influence.

For more than a century, SCMP has been documenting Greater China for the English-speaking diaspora across Asia-Pacific. Before the internet, expatriates and visitors would pick up the paper, sometimes days old, on airplanes and in hotels across the region. For those living in mainland China (like I did in the 1990s), the paper offered a window into the place where they lived, from a familiar yet discrete vantage point.

Now, SCMP uses the web to reach the growing global community of readers interested in news about China, and experiment with new methods of storytelling along the way. After its purchase by Alibaba’s founder Jack Ma in 2016, the newspaper suddenly had a mandate to evolve, and was given the runway and resources to experiment.

“Culture and identity are massively important when you are trying to turn around a 114-year-old company … until you have a company that is ready to experiment, willing to fail, and able to move with agility … you can talk all day long about transformation and where you’re heading but you’ll never get there,” said SCMP CEO Gary Liu in an interview with Harvard’s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Policy.

That entrepreneurial spirit led SCMP to take on an immersive virtual reality project that would trace the history of Hong Kong from British rule to the present day, mining a century’s worth of archival photos and illustrations and presenting them alongside modern-day 360-degree video and drone footage. The project was Google News Lab’s first immersive storytelling partnership in the Asia-Pacific region, part of the team’s broader effort to accelerate immersive storytelling across the news industry.

Title-screen.gif

“It had to be big, bold, and beautiful—and leverage new formats, technologies and platforms to tell the story,” according to SCMP online editor Brett McKeehan, who helmed the project and talked about the process at a recent Google News Lab event.

In order to make the project accessible to as many readers as possible, especially in the smartphone-dominant Asian market, the SCMP team built a responsive website that was optimized for mobile, tablet and desktop. Animations of 3D Google Earth imagery helped to tell the story and orient the reader across time and space throughout the piece.

rain_new_2.JPG
One of Hong Kong’s wettest Junes in history.

They set a deadline to complete the project within two months—an eternity for a newspaper used to daily deadlines. “What can’t you do in two months? What could possibly go wrong? Two months—I thought, we could do anything in two months,” McKeehan said. Shooting and production schedules were set, everyone was ready to go…

And then it rained. And rained and rained—for six straight weeks—one of Hong Kong’s wettest Junes in history.

While it rained, the Hong Kong government changed its drone restrictions, rendering certain planned shots illegal. Meanwhile, SCMP’s developer team of three learned how to build, for the first time, a responsive HTML webframe that would work for both iOS and Android.

SCMP_Back 2017-07-10 at 3.19.46 pm.png
A drone is being readied to capture footage across Hong Kong.

In the end, Brett and his team had to change their project scope and push back their release date to overcome the many unforeseen logistical and development challenges that sprang up throughout the process.

“It’s not a tale of of pixies and rainbows…It is a tale of toil and frustration, and the headaches that come with doing something new.”

Despite the pain, Brett said the experience was worthwhile, because it brought new skills that were now embedded in the newsroom. But for anyone embarking on the journey, he offered the following tips:

  • Embrace the medium: 360, VR, AR offer incredible storytelling possibilities. The sooner you take the plunge, the better. 
  • Experiment with new technologies, but start small before taking on more ambitious projects.
  • Don’t outsource: Bite the bullet, buy your own equipment (get cheap stuff and play). Own your ideas and develop your own talent.

“We’re an aspirational publisher. We’re doing something for the first time. So we made it; we’re happy with that,” McKeehan said.

And that is success, Gary Liu, SCMP’s CEO,  told me after it was published. “The point was to do it and learn in the process.”

Read More
2017 Lux Awards

Samsung’s Programmable Multichannel Driver Selected as Best Enabling Technology at 2017 Lux Awards

Samsung Electronics, a world leader in advanced digital component solutions, today announced that its Programmable Multichannel Driver (PMD) has been selected

Read More

Messenger for Small Businesses: Making Business Personal

Celebrating small businesses who are using Messenger to make business personal again.

Read More
Cisco Connected Sports

#CiscoChat Recap — How Do You Compete for the Digital Sports Fan of 2020 and Beyond?

When it comes to competing for the attention of digital sports fans, the game is constantly changing. Digital technology innovations are paving the way to more connected, more engaging, and, ultimately, more memorable experiences — and also leading to heightened fan expectations. It’s not enough just to keep score from the sidelines. To make the […]

Read More
analytics

Five to Thrive in a Disruptive Environment: Part 2

Check out these leadership tips that will help you navigate mind-boggling opportunities in the hyper-innovative environment.

Read More
IoT

This Holiday Season – Buy One IoT Device, Get Free CVEs

As the Internet of Things gains steam and continues to develop, so are adversaries and the threats affecting these systems. Companies throughout the world are busy deploying low cost Internet-connected computing devices (aka the Internet of Things) to solve business problems and improve our lives. In tandem, criminals are developing their methods for abusing and […]

Read More
Galaxy

Gear S3 Value Pack Update: Timeless Outside. Even More Revolutionary Inside.

Recognized as one of the best-in-class smartwatches in the wearable category, Samsung’s Gear S3 has been praised for its design, user friendliness and

Read More
Adobe Character Animator

Archer Goes Undercover at Comic Con

Rather than create another video featuring Archer half-heartedly apologizing for his absence at San Deigo Comic Con, the show’s production team thought it would be fun to change things up, and have Archer interact in real-time with fans.

Read More
cell phone radiation

Strides in Stewardship, Part 1: Innovating the Mobile Antenna to Maximize User Safety and Device Performance

Radio frequency (RF) radiation (sometimes referred to as “cell phone radiation”) represents one of the most common environmental influences, about which

Read More
Arts & Culture

Defying gravity: an epic stunt at the Guggenheim Bilbao

When the Guggenheim Bilbao museum opened 20 years ago it was described by many as a starship from outer space. Its swirling roof is made of paper-thin titanium tiles—33,000 of them—covering the building like fish scales. At the time, it was such a novelty that the museum had to commission a chemical laboratory to produce a custom liquid to clean the titanium!

GOOGLE.TRASHHAND-14.JPG
Guggenheim Bilbao (photo by Trashhand)

The museum was an unusual experiment not just because of its gleaming shell. Over two decades ago, following the collapse of the traditional industries Bilbao was built on, the city was scarred with industrial wastelands, abandoned factories, and a community afflicted by unemployment and social tensions. Bilbao surprised the world (and raised a few eyebrows) with a unique idea to kickstart the city’s regeneration, and they set out to build—not new factories or new roads—but instead a new center for modern art.

Since then, the museum has attracted 19 million visitors and became the epicenter of the urban renewal that rippled through Bilbao. Today it stands as an icon of the city and its successful self-transformation. To celebrate the Guggenheim’s 20th anniversary, Google Arts & Culture partnered with the museum to bring their stories to you and show it from a new angle.

But how do you find a new angle on one of the world’s most photographed buildings? Google invited Johan Tonnoir—known for running and jumping across Paris’s busy rooftops with only a pair of sturdy shoes—to the Guggenheim.

Johan explored the building in his own way … through a breathtaking stunt-run across the building and its iconic slippery roof. He climbed to the highest peak and jumped, flipped and leapt from one wing of the roof to the other at 50 meters high. And all along, urban photographer Trashhand from Chicago followed him with his lens.

Check out the museum’s masterpieces on Google Arts & Culture (but please don’t try to do it Johan’s way…). You can see all this online at g.co/guggenheimbilbao or in the Google Arts & Culture app on iOS and Android.

Read More
Corporate Others

Samsung Introduces New Premium Ultrasonic Diagnosis Device ‘RS85’

  Samsung Medison, a global medical equipment company and an affiliate of Samsung Electronics, today introduced the RS85, a new premium ultrasonic

Read More
Education

Investing £1 million in training for computing teachers in the U.K.

Advancing our students’ understanding of the principles and practices of computing is critical to developing a competitive workforce for the 21st century.

In every field, businesses of all sizes are looking to hire people who understand computing, so we need more students to leave school confident in skills like coding, computational thinking, machine learning and cybersecurity.

The U.K. has already led the way in preparing for this future by making computer science education a part of the school curriculum in 2014. But we know there is more to do to ensure young people in every community have access to world-class computer science education.

A recent report from the Royal Society found that despite the good progress in recent years, only 11 percent of Key Stage 4 pupils take GCSE computer science. The majority of teachers are teaching an unfamiliar school subject without adequate support. These teachers are eager to offer computer science to their students but they need access to subject area training to build their confidence.

The U.K. government’s announcement that they’re investing £100 million for an additional 8,000 computer science teachers supported by a new National Centre for Computing is an encouraging step forward. It builds on the progress that’s been made since computing was added to the curriculum in 2014 by helping to ensure teachers have the specialist training and support they need to educate the next generation of British computer scientists.

We want to continue to play our part too.

Today we’re announcing £1 million in grants to support training for secondary school computing teachers in the U.K.

The Google.org grant will allow the Raspberry Pi Foundation, the British Computer Society and the National STEM Learning Centre to deliver free computer science and pedagogy training for thousands of key stage 3 and key stage 4 teachers in England over three years, with a specific focus on disadvantaged areas.

A Raspberry Pi and Google teacher training workshop in Leeds, UK
A Raspberry Pi and Google teacher training workshop in Leeds, U.K.

Through this effort, they will make make online courses and professional development resources available to teachers anywhere, anytime, for free, and deliver free in-person workshops for teachers across the country.

Googlers care deeply about helping to develop our future computer scientists, and many of them will give their time and skills to this program. A team of Google engineers and learning and development specialists will volunteer with Raspberry Pi to ensure that all teachers are able to access the online resources and courses.

This grant is part of Google’s long-standing commitment to computer science education. Through Google.org, we’ve given nearly $40 million to organizations around the globe ensuring that traditionally underrepresented students have access to opportunities to explore computer science.

In the U.K., we also support teacher recruitment and professional development by teaming up with organizations like Teach First and University of Wolverhampton, and we focus on inspiring more children, especially girls and those from disadvantaged areas, to take up computing through Code Club UK after-school clubs.

CS education and computational thinking skills are key to the future, and we’re committed to supporting Raspberry Pi—and other organizations like them—to ensure teachers and young people have the skills they’ll need to succeed.

Read More
Scroll Up