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Samsung Introduces the Galaxy A8(2018) and A8+(2018) with Dual Front Camera, Large Infinity Display and Added Everyday Features

Samsung Newsroom December 19, 2017 18.5:9 display ratio, Dual Front Camera, Galaxy, Galaxy A8 and A8+, IP68 water and dust resistance, Live Focus, Mobile, Press Release

  Samsung Electronics today announced the latest additions to the Galaxy A series: the Galaxy A8(2018) and A8+(2018).   The Galaxy A8(2018) and

Quick Boot & the Top Features in the Android Emulator

Android Developers December 18, 2017 Android, Android Emulator, Android Studio

Posted by Jamal Eason, Product Manager, Android

Today, we are excited to announce Quick Boot for the Android Emulator. With
Quick Boot, you can launch the Android Emulator in under 6 seconds. Quick Boot
works by snapshotting an emulator session so you can reload in seconds. Quick
Boot was first released with Android Studio 3.0 in the canary update channel and
we are excited to release the feature as a stable update today.

In addition to this new feature, we also wanted to highlight some of the top
features from recent releases. Since the complete revamp of the Android Emulator
two
years ago
, we continue to focus on improving speed, stability and adding a
rich set of features that accelerate your app development and testing. With all
the recent changes, it is definitely worth updating to the latest version of the
Android Emulator to use it today.

Top 5 Features

  • Quick Boot – Released as a stable feature today, Quick Boot
    allows you to resume your Android Emulator session in under 6 seconds. The first
    time you start an Android Virtual Device (AVD) with the Android Emulator, it
    must perform a cold boot (just like powering on a device), but subsequent starts
    are fast and the system is restored to the state at which you closed the
    emulator last (similar to waking a device). We accomplished this by completely
    re-engineering the legacy emulator snapshot architecture to work with virtual
    sensors and GPU acceleration. No additional setup is required because Quick Boot
    is enabled by default starting with Android Emulator v27.0.2.

Quick Boot in the Android Emulator

  • Android CTS Compatibility With each
    release of the Android SDK, we ensure that the Android Emulator is ready for
    your app development needs, from testing backwards compatibility with Android
    KitKat to integrating the latest APIs of the developer preview. To increase
    product quality and reliability of emulator system images, we now qualify final
    Android System Image builds from Android Nougat (API 24) and higher against the
    Android Compatibility Test
    Suite
    (CTS)—the same testing suite that official Android physical devices
    must pass.
  • Google Play Support We know that many
    app developers use Google Play Services, and it can be difficult to keep the
    service up to date in the Android Emulator system images. To solve this problem,
    we now offer versions of Android System Images that include the Play Store app.
    The Google Play images are available starting with Android Nougat (API 24). With
    these new emulator images, you can update Google Play Services via the Play
    Store app in your emulator just as you would on a physical Android device. Plus,
    you can now test end-to-end install, update, and purchase flows with the Google
    Play Store.
  • Performance Improvements Making the
    emulator fast and performant is an on-going goal for our team. We continuously
    look at the performance impact of running the emulator on your development
    machine, especially RAM usage. With the latest versions of the Android Emulator,
    we now allocate RAM on demand, instead of allocating and pinning the memory to
    the max RAM size defined in your AVD. We do this by tapping into the native
    hypervisors for Linux (KVM) and macOS® (Hypervisor.Framework), and an
    enhanced Intel® HAXM (v6.2.1 and higher) for Microsoft®
    Windows®, which uses the new on-demand memory allocation.
  • Additionally, over the last several releases, we have improved CPU and I/O
    performance while enhancing GPU performance, including OpenGL ES 3.0 support.
    Looking at a common task such as ADB push highlights the improvements in the
    Android CPU and I/O pipelines:

    ADB Push Speed Comparison with Android Emulator

    For GPU performance, we created a sample GPU emulation stress
    test app
    to gauge improvements over time. We found that the latest emulator
    can render higher frame rates than before, and it is one of the few emulators
    that can render OpenGL ES 3.0 accurately per the Android specification.

GPU Emulation Stress Test – Android App

GPU Emulation Stress Test with Android Emulator

More Features

In addition to these major features, there are a whole host of additional
features that we have added to the Android Emulator over the last year that you
may not be aware of:

  • Wi-Fi support – Starting with API 24 system images, you can
    create an AVD that both connects to a virtual cellular network and a virtual
    Wi-Fi Access Point.
  • Google Cast support – When using a Google Play system
    image, you can cast screen and audio content to Chromecast devices on the same
    Wi-Fi network.
  • Drag and drop APKs & files – Simply drag an APK onto the
    Android Emulator window to trigger an app install. Also you can drag any other
    data file and find it in the /Downloads folder in your Android Virtual Device.
  • Host copy & paste – You can copy & paste text between the
    Android Emulator and your development machine.
  • Virtual 2-finger pinch & zoom – When interacting with apps
    like Google Maps, hold down the Ctrl Key (on Microsoft®
    Windows® or Linux) or ⌘ (on macOS® ) , and a finger
    overlay appears on screen to aid with pinch & zoom actions.
  • GPS location – Manually select a GPS point or set of GPS
    points under the Location tab of the Android Emulator.
  • Virtual sensors – There is a dedicated page in the extended
    controls panel that has supported sensors in the Android Emulator including
    acceleration, rotation, proximity and many more.
  • WebCam support – You can use a webcam or your laptop
    built-in webcam as a virtual camera in the AVD. Validate your AVD camera
    settings in the Advanced Settings page in the AVD Manager.
  • Host machine keyboard – You can use your real keyboard to
    enter text into the Android Virtual Device.
  • Virtual SMS and phone calls – In the extended controls
    panel, you can trigger a virtual SMS or phone call to test apps with telephony
    dependencies.
  • Screen zooming – On the main toolbar, click on the magnify
    glass icon to enter zoom mode, and then select a region of the screen you want
    to inspect.
  • Window resizing – Simply drag a corner of the Android
    Emulator window to change to the desired size.
  • Network proxy support – Add a custom HTTP proxy for your
    Android Emulator session by going to the Settings page under the Proxy tab.
  • Bug reporting – You can quickly generate a bug report for
    your app by using the Bug Report section in the extended controls panel to share
    with your team or to send feedback to Google.

Learn more about the Android Emulator in the Emulator
documentation
.

Getting Started

All of these features and improvements are available to download and use now
with Android Emulator v27.0.2+, which you can get via the SDK Manager in Android
Studio. For a fast experience, we recommend creating and running the x86 version
of emulator system images, with the latest Android Emulator, Intel® HAXM (if
applicable) and graphics drivers installed.

We appreciate any feedback on things you like, issues or features you would like
to see. If you find a bug, issue, or have a feature request feel free to file
an issue
. We are definitely not done, but we hope you are excited about the
improvements so far.

Digital Coaches help Black and Latino businesses grow online

JinJa Birkenbeuel December 18, 2017 Diversity, Small Business

Editor’s Note: Today’s guest post comes from JinJa Birkenbeuel, the CEO of Birk Creative, a creative marketing and branding agency.

For the last six months, I’ve been one of eight minority small business owners around the U.S. piloting Google’s Digital Coach program, which offers free workshops for small businesses on how to use Google’s tools for digital marketing. We’re focusing this pilot in cities with historically large communities of Black and Latino small business owners: Atlanta, Austin, Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, and Washington, D.C.

IMG_5866.JPG

I run a creative agency in Chicago called Birk Creative, which I founded in 1997 as a graphic design and print shop–and a way to promote the country/hip-hop band, Utah Carol, that I formed with my husband, Grant. Over the last 20 years, I’ve grown the business to advise other small businesses–and now large corporate clients—on all forms of digital marketing, from designing web sites and online ads to writing social media posts to IT support. With the help of AdWords and Google Analytics in particular, I’ve expanded from a local shop to a full-service agency.

I’ve long wanted to share what I’ve learned over the years with other minority and women business owners. As a Digital Coach, I offer free, open-to-the-public digital marketing lessons (including tutorials from Google’s Get Your Business Online program) and share my own experience on how AdWords, Analytics and other Google tools have helped me solve business challenges.  

Data shows that the total number of Black, Latino, and other minority-owned businesses is growing, and that U.S. Latino small businesses are growing at higher rates than any other U.S. small businesses. Yet Black and Latino-owned businesses are less likely to have websites and less likely to be online than other groups. Our goal with these pilot workshops is to help small businesses like mine participate more fully in the digital economy as they grow.

Since Google launched the pilot in late May, we’ve welcomed more than 5,000 business founders and owners to our Digital Coach workshops around the U.S. We host these events at locations that are familiar to our communities, from the Watts Public Library in Los Angeles to beauty salons in Detroit.

I’ve coached a variety of business owners, including a nail artist, a life coach, a children’s book author and a photo-booth rental company. And there’s one thing they have in common: They’re small, independent businesses or sole proprietorships in Black and Latino communities, all at the point in their growth when they know they can be doing more.

As my Los Angeles Digital Coaches colleague Roberto Martinez says, “Working as a Coach has been transformational. We’re not just presenting or teaching; we are working in tandem with the business owners to better understand how to get ahead of the market.” 

  • hlk_google-fiber-small-business-week_002.jpg

    Program attendees and Googlers at an Austin Coaches program. Austin Digital Coach Vicky Sepulveda is at far right.

  • Screen Shot 2017-12-05 at 9.08.08 AM.png

    Coaches at Google campus in Mountain View, with pilot program leaders. Back row, left to right: Chris Genteel, Google’s Head of Business & Community Inclusion; Coaches JinJa Birkenbeuel, Shelly Bell, Vicente Pimienta, Roberto Martinez; Front row, left to right, Akiva Lewis, Google’s Customer Diversity Lead; Coaches Vicky Sepulveda and Katrina Turnbow; Google Digital Coaches pilot program managers Aisha Taylor and Nicole Herrera; and Coaches Angelina Darrisaw and Justin Dawkins

  • y
    JinJa with children’s book author Valerie Reynolds at  Digital Coaches workshop in Chicago.

After six months of meeting so many business owners from a variety of backgrounds (beyond Black and Latino) at my Digital Coach workshops, I’m inspired by them. Though they come to the Digital Coaching workshops to learn from us, our communities across the U.S. are benefiting from their contributions and expertise. As a Digital Coach, I’m honored to be playing a small part to help their businesses grow, so that all of our vibrant neighborhoods can grow, too.

If you’re interested in finding a workshop near you and to participate in our ongoing pilot in 2018, please visit https://accelerate.withgoogle.com/coaches


(Photo credit for image at top: Steve Capers Photography)

Samsung’s QLED Gaming Monitor Industry’s First to Achieve VESA DisplayHDR™ Certification

Samsung Newsroom December 18, 2017 CHG90, Curved Gaming Monitor, Gaming Monitor, QLED, QLED CHG90, TV & Audio, VESA, Video Electronics Standards Association

  Since its launch in August, Samsung’s CHG90 – the world’s largest QLED gaming monitor – has emerged as an industry innovator and pioneer. The monitor’s

20 Years and Beyond: A celebration of #Cisco Capital and what’s next for financial innovation

Kristine Snow December 18, 2017 #CiscoCapital, channel partner, cisco capital, Cisco financing, consumption models, customer experience, Executive Platform, flexible payment, hardware subscription, Innovation, software enablement

As 2017 comes to a close, we look back at one of the most interesting inflection points in the business landscape. Competition is increasing as growth remains tepid. Geo-political tensions swelled as certainty decreased. In many ways, 2017 was an unprecedented year. It was also an exciting year for Cisco Capital as we celebrated our […]

Introducing Cisco LaunchPad Startup Cohort 3

Ravi Chandrasekaran December 18, 2017 Executive Platform

Cisco LaunchPad’s startup cohort #2 graduated with resounding success. All eight startups received an enthusiastic response from investors, partners, and the Cisco Community. Currently, Cisco LaunchPad has 16 startup alums, of which seven are actively engaged with Cisco on technology and Go-to-Market collaboration. Through Cisco LaunchPad, we are building engagement with highly relevant startup communities […]

Collaborating with NCSU to promote lightweight crypto validation and assessment

Panos Kampanakis December 18, 2017 ACVP, Automated Cryptographic Validation Protocol (ACVP), cryptography, security

Cryptography is very important in today’s world. Improper or maliciously altered crypto implementations have been a concern for the industry in recent years. To alleviate the risk, Cisco has been working with the industry, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and other international organizations on finding ways to validate crypto implementations and speed […]

News Feed FYI: Fighting Engagement Bait on Facebook

Facebook NewsroomFacebook Newsroom December 18, 2017 News Feed FYI

By Henry Silverman, Operations Integrity Specialist and Lin Huang, Engineer People have told us that they dislike spammy posts on Facebook that goad them into interacting with likes, shares, comments, and other actions. For example, “LIKE this if you’re an Aries!” This tactic, known as “engagement bait,” seeks to take advantage of our News Feed […]

The Momentum of Cisco’s Software Defined-Access Continues

Bill Rubino December 15, 2017 Cisco Digital Network Architecture, Cisco DNA ROI Calculator, DNA, Enterprise Networks, SDA, software defined access

As networks grow, so does the complexity that comes with adding new applications and on-boarding new devices—including IoT—all while delivering a more secure network. Add to that challenge the drive to transform the network to deliver new innovative services and applications while providing the best experience for your customers. Read on, because Cisco has the […]

News Lab in 2017: the year in review

Steve Grove December 15, 2017 Journalism & News

In the news and technology communities, the collective sense of urgency about the future of journalism reached new heights this year. Never before has the press been so important—or so under threat. Technology and platforms like the ones Google has built present extraordinary opportunities to strengthen journalism, but they require newsrooms and tech companies working closely together to get it right. That’s why the Google News Lab exists.

In a Keyword series this week, we’ve shared the work the News Lab is doing around the world to address industry challenges and take advantage of new technologies. Today, in our final post in this series, we’re stepping back to give a holistic view of 10 major developments in our work this last year. We’re looking forward to an even bigger 2018 and would love your feedback on how we can partner with the industry to build a stronger future for news.

1. Combating misinformation in European elections

The spread of misinformation is a growing problem for open societies everywhere. So, helping news organizations confront that challenge—especially during elections—was a key focus for us. We helped the First Draft Coalition pioneer new collaborative reporting models to combat misinformation and verify news stories during the UK, French, and German elections.

1

2. Helping users identify trustworthy news content on Google

We worked closely with the news industry to better highlight accurate, quality content on our platforms with new product features and partnerships. Along with the Trust Project, we produced eight indicators of trust that newsrooms can add to their content to help users distinguish between quality content and misinformation. We also partnered with the International Fact-Checking Network and The Poynter Institute to increase the number of verified fact checkers across the world.  

12_2017_YIR_gnl_trustworthy.png

3. Empowering underrepresented voices

Bringing underrepresented voices into newsrooms can help uncover important stories that are left out of mainstream news coverage. We supported ASNE’s survey to get a better sense of diversity in newsrooms across the U.S. We also partnered with organizations in the U.S., Brazil, France and Germany to provide journalists from diverse backgrounds with in-depth programs to develop their careers.

12_2017_YIR_gnl_empowering.png

4. Strengthening local news

With revenue pressures challenging the creation of quality local news content, we began investing in projects to strengthen local newsrooms across the U.S. We partnered with the Society for Professional Journalists to train more than 9,000 local reporters in digital skills. We’re also supporting Report for America, an initiative that will use a Teach for America model to place a thousand journalists in local newsrooms over the next five years.

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5. Researching key challenges in journalism

To better understand key challenges facing the news industry, we produced studies on the state of data journalism in 2017 and how audiences experience VR and what it means for journalists. We also supported the ICFJ’s newsroom study on the usage of technology in newsrooms.

12_2017_YIR_gnl_research.png

6. Working with newsrooms to experiment on new technology

From drones to virtual reality, we helped news organizations understand and use emerging technologies to shape their reporting and engage audiences in new ways. And we experimented with machine learning, too—we partnered with ProPublica to launch Documenting Hate, a project which uses AI to help build a national database for hate crime and bias incidents.   

12_2017_YIR_helping.png

7. Building tools for data journalism

Our research into the state of data journalism found that while half of newsrooms have a dedicated data journalist, many lack the tools and resources to be successful. So we built a number of tools—Flourish, Tilegrams, Data Gif Maker, Election Databot— to make data journalism more accessible to newsrooms and journalists across the world.

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8. Training journalists across the world in digital skills

With our online training center, advanced online learning partnerships, and in-person trainings, we helped train more than 500,000  journalists across the world in digital tools and skills for storytelling and reporting. To develop the next generation of digital journalists, we offered more than 50 News Lab Fellowships with major news organizations across 12 countries.

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9. Helping newsrooms use Google Trends data to support elections coverage

Google Trends data offers news organizations a look at the candidates and issues that voters are interested in during election season. In Germany, we created a Google Trends Hub to show users’ search interest in key candidates and built a visualization tool to bring the data to life. In France, we launched a data driven web app that showed search interest in the candidates over time.

12_2017_YIR_gnl_supporting.png

10. Expanding the News Lab to Brazil and Asia

This year we launched the News Lab in two new markets: Brazil and in Asia. To kick things off we held inaugural News Lab Summits in both regions—convening journalists from 15 states in Brazil and journalists from 15 countries in Singapore. Since then, we’ve trained more than 8,000 journalists in Brazil and 12,000 journalists in Asia.

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It’s an exciting time for journalism. There are many challenges, but we are eager to work with the news industry to build a more informed world. Tell us where you think we should put our efforts—we’d love to hear feedback and new ideas.

Google and Gallup’s computer science education research: six things to know

Jennifer Wang December 15, 2017 Education, Research

Maru Ahues Bouza, an Engineering Manager at Google, wouldn’t be where she is today without her father’s encouragement to learn computer science (CS). Growing up in Venezuela, there were no CS classes for children, so when Maru was just 10 years old, her father enrolled her and her sister in an adult CS class. At first, the girls showed little interest, but with steady support from their father, Maru and her sister became the top performers in the class. Maru continued with CS, graduating from Universidad Simón Bolívar with a Computer Engineering degree. Maru says that she couldn’t have learned CS without her father’s confidence: “if you’re taught from a young age that you can definitely do it, you’re going to grow up knowing you can be successful.”

Maru child image for 12%2F15%2F17 blog.jpg
Maru, on the left, as a child with her sister and father.

Our latest research confirms that this type of support and encouragement is indeed critical. In partnership with Gallup, today we are releasing a new research brief, Encouraging Students Toward Computer Science Learning, and a set of CS education reports for 43 U.S. states. Here are the top six things you should know about the research:

  1. Students who have been encouraged by a teacher or parent are three times more likely to be interested in learning CS.
  2. Boys are nearly two times as likely as girls to report that a parent has told them they would be good at CS.
  3. At age 12, there is no difference in interest in CS between boys and girls. However, the gap widens from age 12 to 14, when 47% of boys are very interested, but only 12% of girls express interest.
  4. Across Black, Hispanic, and White students, girls are less likely to be interested in learning CS compared to boys, with the biggest gap between Black girls (15% interested) and Black boys (44% interested). 
  5. Students are more likely to learn CS in suburban areas (61%) than in rural areas (53%). Regionally, CS is most prevalent in the South or Northeast, where 57% of students are likely to learn CS.
  6. Principals perceive mixed parent and school board support for CS, and top barriers to offering CS include minimal budget for teachers and lack of trained teachers, as well as competing priorities for standardized testing and college requirements.
EngEDU Research Infographics (1).png
EngEDU Research Infographics.jpg

Simple words of support can help more kids like Maru learn CS, no matter who they are or where they live. It’s not hard to encourage students, but we often don’t do so unless a student shows explicit interest. So this winter break, read the research about CS education and take a few minutes to encourage a student to create something using computer science, like coding their own Google logo. This encouragement could spark a student’s lifelong interest in computer science, just like it did for Maru.

ARCore Developer Preview 2

Nikhil Chandhok December 15, 2017 Google AR and VR

Augmented reality is a powerful way to bring the physical and digital worlds together. AR places digital objects and useful information into the real world around us, which creates a huge opportunity to make our phones more intuitive, more helpful and a whole lot more fun.

We’ve been working on augmented reality since 2014, with our earliest investments in Project Tango. We’ve taken everything we learned from that to build ARCore, which launched in preview earlier this year. Whereas Tango required special hardware, ARCore is a fast, performant, Android-scale SDK that enables high-quality augmented reality across millions of qualified mobile devices.

Developers can experiment with ARCore now, and we’ve seen some amazing creations from the community. ARCore also powers AR Stickers on the Pixel camera, which launched earlier this week and lets you add interactive AR characters and playful emojis directly into photos and videos to bring your favorite stories to life.

Today, we’re releasing an update to our ARCore Developer Preview with several technical improvements to the SDK, including:

  • A new C API for use with the Android NDK that complements our existing Java, Unity, and Unreal SDKs;

  • Functionality that lets AR apps pause and resume AR sessions, for example to let a user return to an AR app after taking a phone call;

  • Improved accuracy and runtime efficiency across our anchor, plane finding, and point cloud APIs.

To learn more about the SDK updates, check out the Android, Unity, and Unreal Github pages.

As we focus on bringing augmented reality to the entire Android ecosystem with ARCore, we’re turning down support of Tango. Thank you to our incredible community of developers who made such progress with Tango over the last three years. We look forward to continuing the journey with you on ARCore.

If you’re a developer interested in AR, now’s the time to start experimenting. In the coming months, we’ll launch ARCore v1.0, with support for over 100 million devices. And soon, many augmented reality experiences will be available in the Play Store. We can’t wait to see what you create.

5 ways to improve your hiring process in 2018

Berit Hoffmann December 14, 2017 G Suite

Editor’s note: Senior Product Manager Berit Hoffmann leads Hire, a recruiting application Google launched earlier this year. In this post, she shares five ways businesses can improve their hiring process and secure great talent.

With 2018 quickly approaching, businesses are evaluating their hiring needs for the new year.

According to a recent survey of 2,200 hiring managers, 46 percent of U.S. companies need to hire more people but have issues filling open positions with the right candidates. If your company lacks great hiring processes and tools, it can be easy to make sub-optimal hiring decisions, which can have negative repercussions.

We built Hire to help businesses hire the right talent more efficiently, and integrated it with G Suite to help teams collaborate more effectively throughout the process. As your business looks to invest in talent next year, here are five ways to positively impact your hiring outcomes.

1. Define the hiring process for each role.

Take time to define each stage of the hiring process, and think about if and how the process may need to differ. This will help you better tailor your evaluation of each candidate to company expectations, as well as the qualifications of a particular role.

Mobility best practice in connected workspaces: tiered access at Google

Earlier this year, Google reviewed a subset of its own interview data to discover the optimal number of interviews needed in the hiring process to evaluate whether a candidate is right for Google. Statistical analysis showed that four interviews was enough to predict with 86 percent confidence whether someone should be hired. Of course, every company’s hiring process varies according to size, role or industry—some businesses require double that number of interviews, whereas others may only need one interview.

Using Hire to manage your recruiting activities allows you to configure as many hiring process “templates” as you’d like, as well as use different ones for different roles. For example, you might vary the number of interview rounds based on department. Whatever process you define, you can bring all candidate activity and interactions together within Hire. Plus, Hire integrates with G Suite apps, like Gmail and Calendar, to help you coordinate the process.

2. Make jobs discoverable on Google Search.

For many businesses, sourcing candidates is one of the most time-consuming parts of the hiring process, so Google launched Job Search to help employers better showcase job opportunities in search. Since launching, 60 percent more employers show jobs in search in the United States.

Making your open positions discoverable where people are searching is an important part of attracting the best talent. If you use Hire to post a job, the app automatically formats your public job posting so it is discoverable by job seekers in Google search.

3. Make sure you get timely feedback from interviewers.

The sooner an interviewer provides feedback, the faster your hiring team can reach a decision, which improves the candidate’s experience. To help speed up feedback submissions, some companies like Genius.com use a “silent process” approach. This means interviewers are not allowed to discuss a candidate until they submit written feedback first.

Hire supports this “silent process” approach by hiding other people’s feedback from interviewers until they submit their own. We’ve found that this can incentivize employees to submit feedback faster because they want to see what their colleagues said. 63 percent of Hire interviewers leave feedback within 24 hours of an interview and 75 percent do so within 48 hours.

4. Make sure their feedback is thoughtful, too.

Beyond speedy feedback delivery, it’s perhaps more important to receive quality evaluations. Make sure your interviewers know how to write clear feedback and try to avoid common mistakes such as:

  1. Writing vague statements or summarizing a candidate’s resume.
  2. Restating information from rubrics or questionnaires rather than giving specific  examples.
  3. Getting distracted by personality or evaluating attributes unrelated to the job.

One way you can encourage employees to stay focused when they interview a candidate. is to assign them a specific topic to cover in the interview. In Hire, topics are included in each interviewer’s Google Calendar invitation for easy reference without having to log into the app.

Maintaining a high standard for written feedback helps your team not only make hiring decisions today, but also helps you track candidates for future consideration. Even if you don’t hire someone for a particular role, the person might be a better fit for another position down the road. In Hire, you can find candidates easily with Google’s powerful search technology. Plus, Hire takes past interview feedback into account and ranks previous candidates higher if they’ve had positive feedback.

5. Stop letting internal processes slow you down.

If you don’t manage your hiring process effectively, it can be a huge time sink, especially as employers take longer and longer to hire talent. If your business lags on making a decision, it can mean losing a great candidate.

Implementing a solution like Hire can make it a lot easier for companies to move quickly through the hiring process. Native integrations with the G Suite apps you’re already using can help you cut down on copy-pasting or having to jump between multiple tabs. If you email a candidate in Gmail, it’s automatically synced in Hire so the rest of the hiring team can follow the conversation. And if you need to schedule a multi-slot interview, you can do so easily in Hire which lets you access interviewer availability or even book conference rooms. Since launching in July, we’ve seen the average time between posting a position and hiring a candidate decrease from 128 days to just 21 days (3 weeks!).

Hiring doesn’t have to be hard. Request a demo of Hire to see how you can speed up talent acquisition. Or learn more about how G Suite can help your teams transform the way they work.

LoWPAN on Android Things

Android Developers December 14, 2017

Posted by Dave Smith,
Developer Advocate for IoT

Creating robust connections between IoT devices can be difficult. WiFi and
Bluetooth are ubiquitous and work well in many scenarios, but suffer limitations
when power is constrained or large numbers of devices are required on a single
network. In response to this, new communications technologies have arisen to
address the power and scalability requirements for IoT.

Low-power Wireless Personal Area Network (LoWPAN) technologies are specifically
designed for peer-to-peer usage on constrained battery-powered devices. Devices
on the same LoWPAN can communicate with each other using familiar IP networking,
allowing developers to use standard application protocols like HTTP and CoAP.
The specific LoWPAN technology that we are most excited about is Thread: a secure,
fault-tolerant, low-power mesh-networking technology that is quickly becoming an
industry standard.

Today we are announcing API support for configuring and managing LoWPAN as a
part of Android Things Developer Preview 6.1, including first-class networking
support for Thread. By adding an 802.15.4 radio module to one of our developer
kits
, Android Things devices can communicate directly with other peer
devices on a Thread network. These types of low-power connectivity solutions
enable Android Things devices to perform edge computing tasks,
aggregating data locally from nearby devices to make critical decisions without
a constant connection to cloud services. See the LoWPAN API guide
for more details on building apps to create and join local mesh networks.

Getting Started

OpenThread makes getting started with LoWPAN
on Android Things easy. Choose a supported radio platform, such as the Nordic nRF52840, and
download pre-built
firmware
to enable it as a Network Co-Processor (NCP). Integrate the radio
into Android Things using the LoWPAN
NCP user driver
. You can also expand support to other radio hardware by
building your own user drivers. See the LoWPAN user driver
API guide
for more details.

To get started with DP6.1, use the Android Things Console to
download system images and flash existing devices. Then download the LoWPAN sample app to try it
out for yourself! LoWPAN isn’t the only exciting thing happening in the latest
release. See the release
notes
for the full set of fixes and updates included in DP6.1.

Feedback

Please send us your feedback by filing bug
reports
and feature
requests
, as well as asking any questions on Stack
Overflow
. You can also join Google’s IoT
Developers Community
on Google+, a great resource to get updates and discuss
ideas. Also, we have our new hackster.io
community
, where everyone can share the amazing projects they have built. We
look forward to seeing what you build with Android Things!

Earth to exoplanet: Hunting for planets with machine learning

Chris Shallue December 14, 2017 Machine Learning

For thousands of years, people have looked up at the stars, recorded observations, and noticed patterns. Some of the first objects early astronomers identified were planets, which the Greeks called “planētai,” or “wanderers,” for their seemingly irregular movement through the night sky. Centuries of study helped people understand that the Earth and other planets in our solar system orbit the sun—a star like many others.

Today, with the help of technologies like telescope optics, space flight, digital cameras, and computers, it’s possible for us to extend our understanding beyond our own sun and detect planets around other stars. Studying these planets—called exoplanets—helps us explore some of our deepest human inquiries about the universe. What else is out there? Are there other planets and solar systems like our own?

Though technology has aided the hunt, finding exoplanets isn’t easy. Compared to their host stars, exoplanets are cold, small and dark—about as tricky to spot as a firefly flying next to a searchlight … from thousands of miles away. But with the help of machine learning, we’ve recently made some progress.

One of the main ways astrophysicists search for exoplanets is by analyzing large amounts of data from NASA’s Kepler mission with both automated software and manual analysis. Kepler observed about 200,000 stars for four years, taking a picture every 30 minutes, creating about 14 billion data points. Those 14 billion data points translate to about 2 quadrillion possible planet orbits! It’s a huge amount of information for even the most powerful computers to analyze, creating a laborious, time-intensive process. To make this process faster and more effective, we turned to machine learning.

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The measured brightness of a star decreases ever so slightly when an orbiting planet blocks some of the light. The Kepler space telescope observed the brightness of 200,000 stars for 4 years to hunt for these characteristic signals caused by transiting planets.

Machine learning is a way of teaching computers to recognize patterns, and it’s particularly useful in making sense of large amounts of data. The key idea is to let a computer learn by example instead of programming it with specific rules.

I’m a Google AI researcher with an interest in space, and started this work as a 20 percent project (an opportunity at Google to work on something that interests you for 20 percent of your time). In the process, I reached out to Andrew, an astrophysicist from UT Austin, to collaborate. Together, we took this technique to the skies and taught a machine learning system how to identify planets around faraway stars.

Using a dataset of more than 15,000 labeled Kepler signals, we created a TensorFlow model to distinguish planets from non-planets. To do this, it had to recognize patterns caused by actual planets, versus patterns caused by other objects like starspots and binary stars. When we tested our model on signals it had never seen before, it correctly identified which signals were planets and which signals were not planets 96 percent of the time. So we knew it worked!

Kepler 90i is the eighth planet discovered orbiting the Kepler 90 star, making it the first known 8-planet system outside of our own.

Armed with our working model, we shot for the stars, using it to hunt for new planets in Kepler data. To narrow the search, we looked at the 670 stars that were already known to host two or more exoplanets. In doing so, we discovered two new planets: Kepler 80g and Kepler 90i. Significantly, Kepler 90i is the eighth planet discovered orbiting the Kepler 90 star, making it the first known 8-planet system outside of our own.

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We used 15,000 labeled Kepler signals to train our machine learning model to identify planet signals. We used this model to hunt for new planets in data from 670 stars, and discovered two planets missed in previous searches.

Some fun facts about our newly discovered planet: it’s 30 percent larger than Earth, and with a surface temperature of approximately 800°F—not ideal for your next vacation. It also orbits its star every 14 days, meaning you’d have a birthday there just about every two weeks.

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Kepler 90 is the first known 8-planet system outside of our own. In this system, planets orbit closer to their star, and Kepler 90i orbits once every 14 days. (Note that planet sizes and distances from stars are not to scale.)

The sky is the limit (so to speak) when it comes to the possibilities of this technology. So far, we’ve only used our model to search 670 stars out of 200,000. There may be many exoplanets still unfound in Kepler data, and new ideas and techniques like machine learning will help fuel celestial discoveries for many years to come. To infinity, and beyond!

Local businesses bring in new customers with Posts on Google

Amir Fish December 14, 2017 Small Business

Seven out of ten customers visit a business or make a purchase based on info they found online1. With Posts on Google, businesses can share these timely updates right where people find your business on Search and Maps.

Creative posts help a new restaurant become a local hit

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Igor Chang founded HAO Restaurant and Bar to bring Asian dishes to his beachside neighborhood in João Pessoa, Brazil. HAO keeps its doors open until 3AM, drawing customers for dinner and a night on the town.

Igor uses Posts on Google to get more reservations by sharing discounts on sushi, photos of cocktail specials, and links to videos of HAO’s live jazz band.

In just three months, Igor’s posts received more than 5,000 views. He’s noticed an increase in reservations and often hears customers mention his latest posts.

Mobile-friendly Posts bring visitors to a thrilling destination

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Ramoji Film City is the backdrop for some of India’s biggest films, but it’s also a destination itself, where tourists can explore film sets, stay in luxury hotels, and see live performances.

When T Prasad joined the team at Ramoji Film City, he discovered that 80% of their customers found their business info on mobile devices. So he started sharing mobile-friendly posts with photos of Ramoji’s amusement park and other attractions.

After one month of posting on Google, Prasad saw a 20% increase in website pageviews. He also noticed a jump in calls from people who are excited to visit Ramoji Film City.

A candy shop satisfies their community’s sweet tooth

Raul Vega discovered that Mexican families in his Los Angeles neighborhood wanted to share the candies they loved as kids with their own children in the U.S. So he opened Dulceria Dulfi Mexican Candy Store, which carries sweets from De La Rosa triple-layer marzipan and peanut butter candies to Vero Manitas hand-shaped lollipops.

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Raul uses Posts to share popular candies, seasonal specials and new arrivals with his customers online.

Since he started posting this summer, Raul has seen an average of seven  new customers each week. Those customers make a big difference for his business. Posts also help him track which candies get the most attention, so he can update future orders for his shop.

Posting on Google is a way to share relevant, fresh content with people who search for businesses like yours online. Start posting and reach new customers through your Google listing today.

1Google/Ipsos Connect, “Benefits of a Complete Google My Business Listing,” October 2016. A total of N=15,904 adults 18-64, Google search or maps users, recent category purchasers (Bakery/Sweet shop, Auto, Spa/Hairdresser, Clothing, Bookstore/Logistics) in India, Australia, Germany, Turkey and the U.S.

News Lab in 2017: Our work around the world

Matt Cooke December 14, 2017 Google in Asia, Google in Europe, Journalism & News

This week we’re looking at how the Google News Lab is working with news organizations to build the future of journalism. So far, we shared how the News Lab works with newsrooms to address industry challenges and use emerging technologies. Today, we’ll take a look at the News Lab’s global footprint and its efforts to fuel innovation in newsrooms across the world.

Technology continues to change how journalists across the world report and tell stories. But how technology shapes journalism varies from region to region. This past year our team, the Google News Lab, conducted in-person trainings for journalists across 52 countries. Today, we take a look at the unique challenges of newsrooms in the regions we serve and how we’ve adapted our mission for each region to help build the future of journalism.

Europe

In Europe, it’s been another big year for politics with major general elections taking place in the Netherlands, France, UK, Germany and Norway. We wanted to ensure we were helping newsrooms cover these critical moments with the accuracy and depth they required. So, our efforts across these countries focused on helping newsrooms verify digital content in a timely fashion and providing training in digital skills for journalists.

  • We helped the First Draft Coalition pioneer new collaborative reporting models to combat misinformation and verify news stories during the UKFrench, and German elections. In France, we supported First Draft’s launch of CrossCheck; a collaboration among 37 newsrooms to verify or debunk online stories during the election. In the build up to the elections in the UK and Germany, we also supported fact-checking organizations Full Fact and Correctiv to help newsrooms identify new sources of information. These initiatives helped more than 500 European journalists verify content online and debunk 267 inaccurate stories shared on social during the French and German elections. 
  • Journalists across Europe used Google Trends to help visualize big political stories—here’s a peek at what they did. 
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Journalists attending the European Journalism Centre News Impact Summit in Manchester, UK.
  • We continued to ramp up our efforts to train European journalists digital skills. We worked with The European Journalism Centre on the latest series of the News Impact Summit, providing large-scale training events on news gathering and storytelling, combined with design-thinking workshops for journalists in Rome, Hamburg, Budapest, Manchester and Brussels. And our partnership with Netzwerk Medien-Trainer has provided over a thousand journalists across northern Europe with expert training on data journalism, verification and mapping.

Asia Pacific

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Journalists from across Asia attend a session at our first News Lab Summit in APAC.

This year, we expanded our training and programs to the  Asia Pacific, where we’ve tailored our approach to meet the specific needs of journalists across this diverse landscape. In a part of the world that is largely mobile-first (or mobile-only) and chat apps are the norm, there are a unique set of opportunities and challenges for newsrooms.

  • In July, our first News Lab APAC Summit welcomed 180 guests from 150 news organizations across 15 countries to our offices in Singapore. Product specialists and experts from newsrooms across the region came together to share best practices, learn about emerging technologies, and engage in open dialogue on challenges critical to the news industry.
  • In India, our Teaching Fellow has provided training and support to around 4K journalists and journalism students across the country. Our partnership with the Digital Identities team helped journalists in New Delhi experiment and engage new audiences with their stories.
  • Working in partnership with News Lab, the South China Morning Post released an immersive virtual reality project to depict the changing landscape of Hong Kong over 170 years of history.
  • We’re working to support research projects that tackle industry challenges – working with Media Diversity Australia to quantify issues of diversity and representation in the Australian news organizations, while in South Korea we’re supporting a study about the use of chat apps and their role in the news ecosystem.

Latin America

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Journalists from across Brazil gathered for an open conversation on the future of news at our first News Lab Summit in Brazil.

Working with journalists across Latin America, we elevated new voices beyond traditional newsrooms, and helped established journalists experiment with new technology and research. In Brazil alone there are an estimated 139 million Internet users, providing a huge opportunity for news organizations to experiment and test new formats.

  • We hosted the first Google News Lab Summit in LatAm Google’s HQ in São Paulo, which convened 115 journalists from across Brazil. Attendees from 71 organizations heard from product managers and industry experts about data journalism, immersive storytelling and verification.
  • Impacto.jo, an experimental project in Brazil supported by the News Lab, helps journalists track the social impact of their reporting. As a part of the project, six organizations including Nexo JornalFolha de S. PauloVejaGazeta do PovoNova Escola and Projor will each track the public response and social reaction to their stories. 
  • In Brazil, we brought 300 journalists to a first-of-its-kind independent journalism festival in Rio de Janeiro to share ideas on how to engage audiences online with original journalism.
  • Our Teaching Fellows based in Buenos Aires and Mexico City have travelled beyond Argentina and Mexico to provide 75 workshops in Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Panama, Peru, Puerto Rico and Uruguay

Middle East & Africa

We are focused on the growing number of mobile phone users, providing trainings for journalists on digital integration, as it remains a challenge in this part of the world.

  • We’re working with Code for Africa and the World Bank to provide training to six thousand journalists across 12 major African cities. Their online learning course will provide self-paced lessons for journalists across Africa. They’re also working to support local Hacks/Hackers meetings to bring journalists and developers together to share new ideas.
  • In South Africa, we held a GEN Editors Lab hackathon, in association with Code for Africa, that brought together 35 developers and journalists to tackle a range of topics including misinformation. This builds on our support for previous events in Nigeria and further afield in Australia, Japan, Indonesia, Italy, Ireland, Portugal and Taiwan.
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Journalists in Africa going through digital skills training.

A bulk of our in-person training work has been made possible by the Google News Lab Teaching Fellowship, which launched this year and enlists industry professionals, academic experts and experienced journalists to help us provide practical, in-person workshops and presentations across the world. In total, we hosted workshops, hackathons, and in-person trainings for 48K journalists across 52 countries.

Since we can’t be everywhere in-person, our online training center offers a round-the-clock service in 13 languages including Arabic, Polish, Hebrew and Hindi. We’re continuing to collaborate with training organizations around the world, and our growing Training Network now includes expert trainers in Europe, the U.S. and parts of Asia Pacific. There’s plenty more to do in 2018 and we’re looking forward to working with journalists and newsrooms across the world.

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