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network functions virtualization

Samsung and Open Networking Foundation (ONF) Host ONOS BUILD 2017 to Unleash Software-Defined Next-Generation Network

Samsung Electronics and the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) together will host the ONOS™(Open Network Operating System) BUILD 2017 conference to be held at

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Environment

Why we should develop “circular cities” and how Google technology can help

The process of digging up materials, turning those materials into a product, and shipping it to an “end user” (who eventually tosses it in the trash) is called the “linear” economy, and it’s depleting our world of resources faster than they can be replenished. We need to ditch this old model and move to a “circular” economy. Instead of using raw resources (think timber and ore) to create new products, the circular economy keeps materials in circulation for multiple uses, whether they are maintained, reused, refurbished, or recycled.

Today, 54 percent of the world’s population lives in urban areas accounting for 75 percent of natural resource consumption, 50 percent of global waste production, and 60-80 percent of greenhouse gas emissions. So, the concept of the circular economy is especially relevant in cities.

Digital technology helps city leaders and citizens gather, refine, and analyze data to create cities that are circular by design. Today we published a white paper with our partners at the Ellen MacArthur Foundation that explores how digital technology and a few of Google’s existing efforts can enable more circular cities. Google has captured insights across cities, from the quality of the air people breathe to the amount of solar power people could put on their roof at home. Google Cloud Platform allows for global-scale data sharing and provides the foundation for collaborative projects between public and private organizations, such as the Waze Connected Citizens Program.

Along with Arup and the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, we’re also exploring how to build circular cities through a joint project called the Circularity Lab. Located in both the Bay Area and New York City, the Lab will raise awareness about circularity in the built environment and create a space where people can see how it could positively impact their lives and communities.

The circular economy model, enriched with technology, is a powerful and potentially highly productive combination. We’re excited to continue exploring these opportunities.

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Google.org

Supporting new ideas in the fight against hate

Addressing the threat posed by violence and hate is a critical challenge for us all. Google has taken steps to tackle violent extremist content online—putting our best talent and technology to the task, and partnering with law enforcement agencies, civil society groups, and the wider technology industry. We can’t do it alone, but we’re making progress.

Our efforts to disrupt terrorists’ ability to use the Internet focus on three areas: leveraging technology, conducting and sharing research, and sharing best practices and encouraging affirmative efforts against dangerous radicalization. Today we’re announcing a new effort to build on that third pillar. Over the last year we’ve made $2 million in grants to nonprofits around the world seeking to empower and amplify counter-extremist voices. Today we’re expanding that effort and launching a $5 million Google.org innovation fund to counter hate and extremism. Over the next two years, this funding will support technology-driven solutions, as well as grassroots efforts like community youth projects that help build communities and promote resistance to radicalization.

We’re making our first grant from the fund to the Institute for Strategic Dialogue (ISD), an expert counter-extremist organization in the U.K. ISD will use our $1.3 million grant to help leaders from the U.K.’s technology, academic, and charity sectors develop projects to counter extremism. This will be the largest project of its kind outside of government and aims to produce innovative, effective and data-driven solutions that can undermine and overcome radicalization propaganda. We’ll provide an update in the coming months with more information on how to apply.

By funding experts like ISD, we hope to support sustainable solutions to extremism both online and offline. We don’t have all the answers, but we’re committed to playing our part. We’re looking forward to helping bring new ideas and technologies to life.

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Citizenship

Samsung Opens its Smart Schools in the Zaatari Refugee Camp

In response to the needs of children around the world to access high quality digital education, Samsung Electronics Levant has partnered with Relief

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Chrome enterprise

Two new white papers examine enterprise web browser security

Online security has never been more critical to businesses, and the tools used to access the web are a major factor to evaluate. Choosing an enterprise-grade web browser that offers the right security features keeps businesses’ data protected while enabling employees to take advantage of the open web. But knowing which browser to choose often requires a deep  understanding of security design and implementation tradeoffs that enterprise IT decision makers don’t have the time or resources to fully identify and investigate. Furthermore, well-researched, independently-verifiable data on enterprise browser security is in short supply. And in its absence, many IT administrators resort to guesswork and experimentation in their decision-making.

This complex landscape of enterprise browser security is the topic of two white papers recently published from security engineering firms X41 D-Sec GmbH and Cure53. Both firms have extensive industry experience and expertise in information security, application security, web application security and vulnerability discovery. These two papers leverage that expertise to examine the relative security strengths of the three most popular enterprise browsers: Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, and Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE).

We sponsored this research, which was conducted independently by the research firms, to help enterprise IT administrators evaluate which browser best fits their security and functionality needs. To be most useful for enterprises and the public, Cure53 and X41 performed their research and testing using only publicly available information, and clearly documented their comparison methodologies. This enables anyone to recreate their tests, validate their methodologies, and verify their conclusions.

Although Cure53 and X41 produced these white papers in isolation from each other, both came to similar conclusions when it came to enterprise browser security. Here are their findings in a few key areas:

Phishing and malware protection is critical to staying safe on the web.

The prevalence of phishing to steal credentials and deliver malicious payloads makes protection more critical than ever. X41 found that Safe Browsing on Chrome and SmartScreen on Edge and IE offered similar protection, with Safe Browsing performing more accurately than SmartScreen in some test results.

Isolating application components through sandboxing reduces risk.

Sandboxing isolated application components from one another, and from the rest of the system, limits the potential impact of vulnerabilities. Cure53 and X41 both found that Chrome renderers have significantly less access to the operating system than Edge or IE, including revoking access to win32k system calls in Chrome renderers and plug-in processes. Cure53 and X41 also found that Chrome has more types of sandboxed processes, for finer-grained privilege separation. Edge uses out-of-process JavaScript compilation, enabling Edge content processes to drop the privilege to create executable memory.

Modern browsers that eliminate legacy functionality are more secure.

Browser Helper Objects (BHOs) and plug-ins like ActiveX have been a go-to choice for client-side attacks. Cure53 and X41 found that Chrome and Edge do not support these vulnerable technologies. IE supports both, making it more susceptible to attack than either Edge or Chrome. Additionally, Cure53 and X41 found that IE is still vulnerable to attacks via signed Java Applets, and more susceptible to malicious Flash content. While Chrome and Edge can both be configured to fall back to IE to support legacy compatibility, administrators can exert more control over Chrome’s fallback mechanism.

Web security is one of Google’s primary concerns, and has been a guiding principle for Chrome since day one. We’re pleased that these papers independently confirm significant improvements in the enterprise browser security landscape overall. We think strong security safeguards, regardless of which browser you choose, make the web better, and safer, for everyone. We hope these white papers can help you find the right solution for your business.

Take a read through the white papers linked above to learn more about their findings. If you’d like to take a deeper look at the security controls available in Chrome or download the Chrome enterprise bundle, visit the Chrome enterprise website.

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Develop

Google Play Billing Library 1.0 released

Posted by Neto Marin, Developer Advocate

In June we announced the developer
preview for a new Google Play Billing Library
. Today, we are pleased to
announce the official release of the Play Billing Library 1.0. This library
simplifies the development process for Google Play Billing, allowing you to
focus your efforts on your app.

Thank you for your valuable feedback and suggestions that helped us reach the
1.0 release. Watch the video below for a quick overview of the library’s
features.

Before you start

With Play Billing, you can receive payments from users around the world via a
payment system they trust and you can take advantage of features and reports in
the Play Console to manage and earn more revenue.

If you have never implemented in-app billing in your apps, or you want to know
what you can offer using Play Billing Library, read the In-app
Billing Overview
to familiarize yourself with concepts and terminology that
make it easier for you to implement In-app Billing using the Play Billing
Library.

Getting started

Play Billing Library is available through Maven repository, and adding Play
Billing Library to your project is simple as adding the following dependency
into your app’s build.gradle file:

dependencies {
    ...
    compile 'com.android.billingclient:billing:1.0'
}

The Play Billing Library 1.0 automatically adds the
com.android.vending.BILLING permission to your APK. This means you
no longer need to manually include it in your application module’s manifest.

BillingClient and PurchasesUpdatedListener

These classes are the most important pieces when integrating the library into
your Android app. The BillingClient
is the bridge between your app and Google Play. You will use it for listing
available products, starting the billing flow for in-app products or
subscriptions (i.e. opening the payment interface), getting user purchases, and
creating or modifying subscriptions.

When creating your BillingClient
instance, you’ll need to set a PurchasesUpdatedListener.
This allows your app to receive updates from the In-app Billing API, including
transaction results after the billing flow, as well as purchases completed
outside of your app, e.g. user redeemed a Promo Code or bought a product on
another device.

The following code demonstrates how you could override the onPurchasesUpdated()
method of your PurchasesUpdatedListener:

@Override
void onPurchasesUpdated(@BillingResponse int responseCode,
        List<Purchase> purchases) {
    if (responseCode == BillingResponse.OK
            && purchases != null) {
        for (Purchase purchase : purchases) {
            handlePurchase(purchase);
        }
    } else if (responseCode == BillingResponse.USER_CANCELED) {
        // Handle an error caused by a user canceling the purchase flow.
    } else {
        // Handle any other error codes.
    }
}

You can implement the PurchasesUpdatedListener
in your Activity or in any other class you want, according to your app’s
architecture. And here’s the code for creating the BillingClient
instance, and setting the PurchasesUpdatedListener:

mBillingClient = BillingClient.newBuilder(mContext)
                              .setListener(mPurchasesUpdatedListener)
                              .build();

Listing and selling products

To sell products in your app, first, you need to add them using the Play
Console. For more details about how to add in-app products see the page Administering
In-app Billing
.

Attention: If this is a brand new app, before adding
the products you must publish it to the alpha or beta distribution channel. For
more information, see Draft
Apps are No Longer Supported
.

To get a list of product details with prices for current user, call querySkuDetailsAsync().
You must also specify a listener which implements the SkuDetailsResponseListener
interface. You can then override the onSkuDetailsResponse()
method which notifies the listener when the query finishes, as illustrated by
the following sample code:

List<String> skuList = new ArrayList<> ();
skuList.add("premiumUpgrade");
skuList.add("gas");
SkuDetailsParams.Builder params = SkuDetailsParams.newBuilder();
params.setSkusList(skuList).setType(SkuType.INAPP);
mBillingClient.querySkuDetailsAsync(params.build(),
    new SkuDetailsResponseListener() {
        @Override
        public void onSkuDetailsResponse(SkuDetailsResult result) {
            // Process the result.
        }
    })

After the user chooses a product to buy, you’ll need to start the billing flow
and handle the transaction result. To start a purchase request from your app,
call the launchBillingFlow()
method on the Play Billing Library client. You must call the launchBillingFlow()
method (and all the other methods from BillingClient)
from the UI thread.

The launchBillingFlow()
method needs BillingFlowParams
object that contains relevant data for completing the purchase, such as the
product ID of the item to purchase and the product type (in this case, SkuType.INAPP).
To get an instance of BillingFlowParams,
construct it with newBuilder()
method:

BillingFlowParams.Builder builder = BillingFlowParams
                                       .newBuilder()
                                       .setSku(skuId).setType(SkuType.INAPP);
int responseCode = mBillingClient.launchBillingFlow(builder.build());

As we mentioned earlier, the transaction result will be sent to the onPurchasesUpdated()
method. For details how to process the data received on onPurchasesUpdated()
and how to handle a purchase, check the section Purchase
an item
in our training guide.

Consuming products

By default, all in-app products are managed. It means that Google Play tracks
the product ownership and doesn’t allow to buy multiple times. To be able to buy
a product again, you must consume the product before it becomes available again.

It’s common to implement consumption for in-app products which users may want to
purchase multiple times, such as in-game currency or equipment. You typically
don’t want to implement consumption for in-app products that user purchases once
and provide a permanent effect, such as a premium upgrade.

To consume a product, call the consumeAsync()
method on the Play Billing Library client and pass in the
purchaseToken String value returned when you made the purchase. The
consumption result is returned via onConsumeResponse() method of the ConsumeResponseListener
interface, that you must override to handle the consumption result.

The following example illustrates consuming a product using the associated
purchaseToken:

ConsumeResponseListener listener = new ConsumeResponseListener() {
    @Override
    public void onConsumeResponse(@BillingResponse int responseCode, 
                                  String outToken) {
        if (responseCode == BillingResponse.OK) {
            // Handle the success of the consume operation.
            // For example, increase the number of player's coins,
            // that provide temporary benefits
        }
    }
};
mBillingClient.consumeAsync(purchaseToken, listener);

Sample updated: Trivial Drive V2

With a new library comes a refreshed sample! To help you to understand how to
implement in-app billing in your app using the new Play Billing Library, we’ve
rewritten the Trivial
Drive
sample from the ground up.

Since we released Trivial Drive back in 2013, many new features, devices, and
platforms have been added to the Android ecosystem. To reflect this evolution,
the Trivial
Drive v2
sample now runs on Android TV and Android Wear.

What’s next?

Before integrating within your app, you can try the Play Billing Library with
the codelab published during Google I/O 2017: Buy
and Subscribe: Monetize your app on Google Play
.

In this codelab, you will start with a simplified version of Trivial Drive V2
that lets users to “drive” and then you will add in-app billing to it. You’ll
learn how to integrate purchases and subscriptions as well as the best practices
for developing reliable apps that handle purchases.

Get more info on the Play
Billing Library
and the official
reference
for classes and methods documentation on the Android Developers
website. For a step-by-step guide to implementing the Play Billing Library in
your project, visit the library’s
training class
.

For more details about the Play Billing Library 1.0 release, check out the Releases Notes page, where you can find updates, bug fixes and behavior changes on the library since the Developer Preview release.

We still want your feedback

If you have issues or questions, file a bug
report
on the Google Issue Tracker, and for issues and suggestions on the
sample (like a bug or a new feature), contact us on the Trivial
Drive issues page
.

For technical questions on implementation, library usage, and best practices,
you can use the tags google-play
and play-billing-library
on StackOverflow or visit the communities on our
Google+ page.

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Galaxy

[Interview] How Samsung “Unpacked” the Galaxy Note8

At Galaxy Unpacked 2017, Samsung Electronics demonstrated – on a very big stage with even bigger effects – how the Galaxy Note8, its newest flagship

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News

What Vox Learned from Building Groups and Creating Communities on Facebook

By Meghan Peters, News Partnerships In November 2016, when it became clear the future of the Affordable Care Act was in doubt, journalist Sarah Kliff, and members of Vox’s social team wanted to build a community for Americans most impacted…

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Chip-scale package

Samsung Introduces Highly Advanced, Enhanced Chip-Scale LED Packages for Spotlights and High-Bay Applications

  Samsung Electronics, a world leader in advanced digital component solutions, today announced two new additions to its chip-scale package (CSP) line-up:

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Ergonomic design

[Hands-On] The Gear Fit2 Pro – Built to Go Beyond Fitness

Made for all the ways people work out, Samsung Electronics’ water-resistant Gear Fit2 Pro helps users stay motivated, maintain a healthy lifestyle and achieve

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ISUOG

Samsung Presents Clinical Usability of its Ultrasound Imaging Technology at ISUOG 2017

  Samsung Medison, a global medical equipment company and an affiliate of Samsung Electronics, is hosting a number of seminars at the 27th World Congress

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built-in appliances

Winning the Built-in that Takes Up 40% of the Total Appliances Market in Europe

  Did you know that four out of ten refrigerators in the European market are built-in types?   It is a simple yet noteworthy statistic of the

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Home Appliances

Samsung Smart Home: A Closer Look at Your Future Home

In the IoT era, what will the “smart home” look like? From September 8 to October 23, Samsung Electronics will be showcasing its vision for the smart home at

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Android Things

Android Things Hackster Contest

Posted by Dave Smith,
Developer Advocate for IoT

Android Things
lets you build professional, mass-market products on a trusted platform, without
previous knowledge of embedded system design. With Android Things you get a
turnkey hardware solution and an easy-to-use software development platform based
on Android Studio and the Android SDK — making it easy to build designs that
scale to production. Android Things is currently in developer preview and we’d
love to see what you can build with our
latest release
.

Today we are announcing a contest with Hackster and NXP for developers to
showcase their use of Android Things with other Google developer platforms.
Project ideas should be added to Google’s Hackster.io Community by
including Android Things
as a software component, then registered through the contest page.

Idea Submissions

Submit your project ideas starting today. Ideas submitted by September 29, 2017
are eligible to receive one of 120 Pico Pi i.MX6UL Kits to use in the final design. During this phase, projects do
not need to be complete; we just want to see your amazing ideas! We are looking
for concepts in the following categories:

  • Smart Home
  • Robotics
  • Smart City
  • Industrial IoT / Manufacturing
  • Retail
  • Entertainment

Project Submissions

Final projects must be submitted by Oct 31, 2017. Your project does not need to
be one of the chosen recipients of a Pico kit to be eligible for the grand
prize. Winners will receive support from Avnet, Dragon Innovation and
Kickstarter to take their ideas from prototype to production. See the contest page for more
details.

We are eager to see the projects that you come up with. More importantly, we’re
excited to see how your work can inspire other developers to create something
great with Android Things. To learn more about the benefits of Android Things,
watch the recording from the Bootstrapping IoT Products with Android
Things
webinar. You can also join Google’s IoT
Developers Community
on Google+, a great resource to get updates, ask
questions, and discuss ideas.

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Company News

Expanding Facebook AI Research to Montreal

We’re announcing a new AI research lab in Montreal and launching partnerships with the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR), the Montreal Institute for Learning Algorithms (MILA), McGill University, and Université de Montréal.

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