Project Fi welcomes Android One, with the moto x4

Project Fi welcomes Android One, with the moto x4

With Project Fi, we set out to make your wireless experience fast, easy and fair—with access to three national 4G LTE networks, and international roaming at no extra cost. But many of you have asked us for more options for high quality, affordable devices that work with Project Fi. We’ve heard you and we’re excited to launch our newest phone for Project Fi: the Android One moto x4.

We took some important steps with Android One earlier this month by expanding the program to bring a fresh, secure software experience designed by Google to more high-quality devices no matter the price point. The launch of Android One moto x4 on Project Fi is the next step in our commitment to work with more partners and expand Android One to new places.

  • Google Assistant
    Your Google Assistant experience is fully optimized on the Android One moto x4
  • Unlimited storage from Google Photos
    Unlimited high-quality photo storage built-in with Google Photos
  • Security
    Enjoy top of the line security with Google Play Protect and regular security updates
  • Android updates
    Stay fresh with the latest updates from Android

Packed with a pure Android experience, advanced hardware and great network connectivity, here’s a closer look at what you’ll get with the new Android One moto x4.

Best-in-class software experience designed by Google

Like all Android One phones, Android One moto x4 runs a pure Android experience, with a clean software design and a carefully curated set of preinstalled apps to give you just what you need. For example, it comes optimized for the Google Assistant to help you get more done, and offers high-quality video calling with Google Duo. You’ll also get access to the latest updates from Android, such as Android Oreo before the end of the year. Android One moto x4 will be among the first to receive an upgrade to Android P.


Powerful cameras and unlimited high-quality photo storage

The Android One moto x4 comes with three cameras. A 12MP + 8MP dual rear camera system lets you capture wide-angle photos and detailed portraits. The front-facing camera comes packed with 16MP and an adaptive low light mode. And with free high quality storage from Google Photos, you never have to worry about running out of space.


All day battery and ultra-fast charging

Power through the day and enjoy your favorite Android software features like battery saver. When you need to recharge, TurboPower™ charging makes it ultra fast: You can get up to six hours of power in just 15 minutes.

Top of the line security

The Android One moto x4 will receive timely security updates and built-in malware protection from Google Play Protect, working around the clock to keep your device, data and apps safe.

The Android One moto x4 is priced at $399, comes in Super Black and Sterling Blue, and is available only in the U.S. on Project Fi’s network. You can pre-order it on the Project Fi website starting today. If you’ve got an older Nexus phone and want to trade it in for a new device, we’re making it easier than ever with our new trade-in program. We’ll give you up to $165 for select Nexus devices, and if you start your trade-in for an Android One moto xby October 5, you’ll earn an extra $50 Fi credit.

Hector Mujica on “showing grace to those in the margins” and his social impact work at Google

Hector Mujica on “showing grace to those in the margins” and his social impact work at Google

In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, we’re celebrating the fascinating stories and important contributions of our Hispanic Googlers—their histories, their families, and what keeps them busy inside and outside of work. 

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Any Venezuelan football fans out there? Here I am showing some love for “Vino Tinto.”

Next up is Hector Mujica, social justice champion, enthusiast of the outdoors, and self-proclaimed acronym inventor (SPAI).

Give us the 10-second, one-sentence version of what you do at Google.

I work on Google.org, Google’s philanthropy team, where I manage our programs across Latin America, and support our disaster relief giving and volunteering work globally.

When did you (or generations before you) immigrate to the U.S.?

My family immigrated to the U.S. from Venezuela when I was a young child, after my dad landed a job at Oracle in Miami. Of all the places to start in America, South Florida must be one of the best—with the rich cultural diversity and ample Latin food, it made the transition smooth, and kept me close to my Hispanic heritage.

How are you involved in the Hispanic community at Google, and why is it important to you?

I worked closely on the founding of HOLA, our Hispanic employee resource group (ERG). Through HOLA, I’ve gotten to meet many of our Latino Googlers over the years—all of whom continue to amaze me with their stories, talents, and passions to make this company, and the world, a better, more equitable place. The Hispanic community is vital to Google because it brings in people who might otherwise feel like cultural strangers and tells them, “come as you are—you belong.”

The Hispanic community is vital to Google because it brings in people who might otherwise feel like cultural strangers and tells them, “come as you are—you belong.”

How did you find your way to Google? Have you always pictured yourself working here?

I actually never had ambitions to work in tech or at Google. While in my junior year of undergrad at Florida International University, I looked for internships around the country, and was intrigued by working at company that was breaking all the established norms in corporate America. I applied to Google’s BOLD internship program, thinking it was a long shot, and after a few interviews, I found myself living out the coldest summer of my life in San Francisco, interning at Google on the People Operations team. I fell in love with Northern California and Google, and anxiously awaited the opportunities that lay ahead.

40279_10150238167060245_4366738_n.jpg
Day one of my BOLD internship at Google in 2010, before I learned that dress shirts and ties are not part of the dress code at Google.

Who has been the most influential person in your life?

My dad’s hustle, grit, passion and optimism have taught me much about life and the world. As a first-generation immigrant, he taught me about risk-taking and tenacity. As a man of faith, he’s taught me about unapologetically straying true to my convictions. As a family man, he’s been a caretaker and steward of not only his nuclear family, but—like a good Latino—his extended family as well. He’s always balanced family life with the needs of the community. Whether it meant taking immigrant families into our home while they got on their feet, working with the homeless to help them rehabilitate, or volunteering to feed the needy at nearby shelters, my dad never turned down a chance show grace to those in the margins. These experiences shaped my worldview and gave me sense of social justice and altruism, which continues to influence the work I do today at Google.org.

Kilimanjaro.jpg
Sunrise on top of the world, at the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro. Climbing mountains is tough, but the summit is always worth it.

How do you spend your time outside of work?

Outdoors. Or traveling to experience the outdoors in the rest of the world. I’ve always been in awe of nature. Oceans and mountains both scare me and inspire me. Whenever I have a chance to see the natural world from a new angle, I usually take it. That wanderlust has taken me to nearly every continent (Antarctica, I’m coming for you!), 51 countries, and from the deepest depths (I’m a scuba diver) to some of the highest highs (just did Kilimanjaro last year!).

What career advice would you give your 20-year-old self?

Invest wisely in people and moments. The networks of people around you will help shape your perspectives, career and open doors to new opportunities … and when these opportunities present themselves, capitalize on the moments. They will teach you more than any classroom can.

What has been a big moment for you at Google?

I’ve had many Google “magic moments,” but the one that comes to mind was Googlers’ collective reaction to the travel ban earlier this year. Within days of the ban, Googlers organized a demonstration and showed up in full force, with messages of encouragement and enthusiasm during grim times. My team and I assembled a $4 million crisis fund to support key organizations that were leading the way in fighting injustice and intolerance. This moment reinforced in me the power of unity and comradery at Google, and within immigrant communities, who bring their best selves to this great country of ours.

As a Venezuelan-American that has benefited from ample opportunity, I am compelled to give back to my community. That’s why I’m so thankful of the opportunity I have at Google.org to invest in a better, most just, and more equitable world, for everyone.

  • Extended Family.jpg
    “La familia lo es todo.” Here is most of my extended family, who never misses a chance to get together and build new memories.
  • DSC_0120.jpg
    Volunteering with my teammates during GoogleServe 2016, our annual month of service at Google.
  • 16422771_10107484261002770_823508372964323153_o.jpg

    Participating in demonstration with my team, who showed up in full force to support our immigrant communities and colleagues earlier this year.

Addressing the UK NCSC’s Cloud Security Principles

Addressing the UK NCSC’s Cloud Security Principles

As your organization adopts more cloud services, it’s essential to get a clear picture of how sensitive data will be protected. Many authorities, from government regulators, to industry standards bodies and consortia, have provided guidance on how to evaluate cloud security. Notably, the UK National Cyber Security Centre offers a framework built around 14 Cloud Security Principles, and we recently updated our response detailing how we address these principles for both Google Cloud Platform (GCP) and G Suite. Google Cloud customers in the UK public sector can use the response to assess the suitability of these Google Cloud products to host their data with sensitivity levels up to “OFFICIAL,” including “OFFICIAL SENSITIVE.”

The UK National Cyber Security Centre was set up to improve the underlying security of the UK internet and to protect critical services from cyber attacks. Its 14 Cloud Security Principles are expansive and thorough, and include such important considerations as data in-transit protection, supply chain security, identity and authentication and secure use of the service.

The 14 NCSC Cloud Security Principles allow service providers like Google Cloud to highlight the security benefits of our products and services in an easily consumable format. Our response provides details about how GCP and G Suite satisfy the recommendations built into each of the principles, and describes the specific best practices, services and certifications that help us address the goals of each recommendation.

The NCSC also provides detailed ChromeOS deployment guidance to help organizations follow its 12 End User Device Security Principles. With an end-to-end solution encompassing GCP, applications and connected devices, Google Cloud provides the appropriate tools and functionality to allow you to adhere to the NCSC’s stringent security guidelines in letter and spirit.

Our response comes on the heels of GCP opening a new region in London, which allows GCP customers in the UK to improve the latency of their applications.

We look forward to working with all manner of UK customers, regulated and otherwise, as we build out a more secure, intelligent, collaborative and open cloud.

Samsung and Open Networking Foundation (ONF) Host ONOS BUILD 2017  to Unleash Software-Defined Next-Generation Network

Samsung and Open Networking Foundation (ONF) Host ONOS BUILD 2017 to Unleash Software-Defined Next-Generation Network

Samsung Electronics and the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) together will host the ONOS™(Open Network Operating System) BUILD 2017 conference to be held at

Why we should develop “circular cities” and how Google technology can help

Why we should develop “circular cities” and how Google technology can help

The process of digging up materials, turning those materials into a product, and shipping it to an “end user” (who eventually tosses it in the trash) is called the “linear” economy, and it’s depleting our world of resources faster than they can be replenished. We need to ditch this old model and move to a “circular” economy. Instead of using raw resources (think timber and ore) to create new products, the circular economy keeps materials in circulation for multiple uses, whether they are maintained, reused, refurbished, or recycled.

Today, 54 percent of the world’s population lives in urban areas accounting for 75 percent of natural resource consumption, 50 percent of global waste production, and 60-80 percent of greenhouse gas emissions. So, the concept of the circular economy is especially relevant in cities.

Digital technology helps city leaders and citizens gather, refine, and analyze data to create cities that are circular by design. Today we published a white paper with our partners at the Ellen MacArthur Foundation that explores how digital technology and a few of Google’s existing efforts can enable more circular cities. Google has captured insights across cities, from the quality of the air people breathe to the amount of solar power people could put on their roof at home. Google Cloud Platform allows for global-scale data sharing and provides the foundation for collaborative projects between public and private organizations, such as the Waze Connected Citizens Program.

Along with Arup and the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, we’re also exploring how to build circular cities through a joint project called the Circularity Lab. Located in both the Bay Area and New York City, the Lab will raise awareness about circularity in the built environment and create a space where people can see how it could positively impact their lives and communities.

The circular economy model, enriched with technology, is a powerful and potentially highly productive combination. We’re excited to continue exploring these opportunities.

Supporting new ideas in the fight against hate

Supporting new ideas in the fight against hate

Addressing the threat posed by violence and hate is a critical challenge for us all. Google has taken steps to tackle violent extremist content online—putting our best talent and technology to the task, and partnering with law enforcement agencies, civil society groups, and the wider technology industry. We can’t do it alone, but we’re making progress.

Our efforts to disrupt terrorists’ ability to use the Internet focus on three areas: leveraging technology, conducting and sharing research, and sharing best practices and encouraging affirmative efforts against dangerous radicalization. Today we’re announcing a new effort to build on that third pillar. Over the last year we’ve made $2 million in grants to nonprofits around the world seeking to empower and amplify counter-extremist voices. Today we’re expanding that effort and launching a $5 million Google.org innovation fund to counter hate and extremism. Over the next two years, this funding will support technology-driven solutions, as well as grassroots efforts like community youth projects that help build communities and promote resistance to radicalization.

We’re making our first grant from the fund to the Institute for Strategic Dialogue (ISD), an expert counter-extremist organization in the U.K. ISD will use our $1.3 million grant to help leaders from the U.K.’s technology, academic, and charity sectors develop projects to counter extremism. This will be the largest project of its kind outside of government and aims to produce innovative, effective and data-driven solutions that can undermine and overcome radicalization propaganda. We’ll provide an update in the coming months with more information on how to apply.

By funding experts like ISD, we hope to support sustainable solutions to extremism both online and offline. We don’t have all the answers, but we’re committed to playing our part. We’re looking forward to helping bring new ideas and technologies to life.

Two new white papers examine enterprise web browser security

Two new white papers examine enterprise web browser security

Online security has never been more critical to businesses, and the tools used to access the web are a major factor to evaluate. Choosing an enterprise-grade web browser that offers the right security features keeps businesses’ data protected while enabling employees to take advantage of the open web. But knowing which browser to choose often requires a deep  understanding of security design and implementation tradeoffs that enterprise IT decision makers don’t have the time or resources to fully identify and investigate. Furthermore, well-researched, independently-verifiable data on enterprise browser security is in short supply. And in its absence, many IT administrators resort to guesswork and experimentation in their decision-making.

This complex landscape of enterprise browser security is the topic of two white papers recently published from security engineering firms X41 D-Sec GmbH and Cure53. Both firms have extensive industry experience and expertise in information security, application security, web application security and vulnerability discovery. These two papers leverage that expertise to examine the relative security strengths of the three most popular enterprise browsers: Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, and Microsoft Internet Explorer (IE).

We sponsored this research, which was conducted independently by the research firms, to help enterprise IT administrators evaluate which browser best fits their security and functionality needs. To be most useful for enterprises and the public, Cure53 and X41 performed their research and testing using only publicly available information, and clearly documented their comparison methodologies. This enables anyone to recreate their tests, validate their methodologies, and verify their conclusions.

Although Cure53 and X41 produced these white papers in isolation from each other, both came to similar conclusions when it came to enterprise browser security. Here are their findings in a few key areas:

Phishing and malware protection is critical to staying safe on the web.

The prevalence of phishing to steal credentials and deliver malicious payloads makes protection more critical than ever. X41 found that Safe Browsing on Chrome and SmartScreen on Edge and IE offered similar protection, with Safe Browsing performing more accurately than SmartScreen in some test results.

Isolating application components through sandboxing reduces risk.

Sandboxing isolated application components from one another, and from the rest of the system, limits the potential impact of vulnerabilities. Cure53 and X41 both found that Chrome renderers have significantly less access to the operating system than Edge or IE, including revoking access to win32k system calls in Chrome renderers and plug-in processes. Cure53 and X41 also found that Chrome has more types of sandboxed processes, for finer-grained privilege separation. Edge uses out-of-process JavaScript compilation, enabling Edge content processes to drop the privilege to create executable memory.

Modern browsers that eliminate legacy functionality are more secure.

Browser Helper Objects (BHOs) and plug-ins like ActiveX have been a go-to choice for client-side attacks. Cure53 and X41 found that Chrome and Edge do not support these vulnerable technologies. IE supports both, making it more susceptible to attack than either Edge or Chrome. Additionally, Cure53 and X41 found that IE is still vulnerable to attacks via signed Java Applets, and more susceptible to malicious Flash content. While Chrome and Edge can both be configured to fall back to IE to support legacy compatibility, administrators can exert more control over Chrome’s fallback mechanism.

Web security is one of Google’s primary concerns, and has been a guiding principle for Chrome since day one. We’re pleased that these papers independently confirm significant improvements in the enterprise browser security landscape overall. We think strong security safeguards, regardless of which browser you choose, make the web better, and safer, for everyone. We hope these white papers can help you find the right solution for your business.

Take a read through the white papers linked above to learn more about their findings. If you’d like to take a deeper look at the security controls available in Chrome or download the Chrome enterprise bundle, visit the Chrome enterprise website.

Google Play Billing Library 1.0 released

Google Play Billing Library 1.0 released

Posted by Neto Marin, Developer Advocate

In June we announced the developer
preview for a new Google Play Billing Library
. Today, we are pleased to
announce the official release of the Play Billing Library 1.0. This library
simplifies the development process for Google Play Billing, allowing you to
focus your efforts on your app.

Thank you for your valuable feedback and suggestions that helped us reach the
1.0 release. Watch the video below for a quick overview of the library’s
features.

Before you start

With Play Billing, you can receive payments from users around the world via a
payment system they trust and you can take advantage of features and reports in
the Play Console to manage and earn more revenue.

If you have never implemented in-app billing in your apps, or you want to know
what you can offer using Play Billing Library, read the In-app
Billing Overview
to familiarize yourself with concepts and terminology that
make it easier for you to implement In-app Billing using the Play Billing
Library.

Getting started

Play Billing Library is available through Maven repository, and adding Play
Billing Library to your project is simple as adding the following dependency
into your app’s build.gradle file:

dependencies {
    ...
    compile 'com.android.billingclient:billing:1.0'
}

The Play Billing Library 1.0 automatically adds the
com.android.vending.BILLING permission to your APK. This means you
no longer need to manually include it in your application module’s manifest.

BillingClient and PurchasesUpdatedListener

These classes are the most important pieces when integrating the library into
your Android app. The BillingClient
is the bridge between your app and Google Play. You will use it for listing
available products, starting the billing flow for in-app products or
subscriptions (i.e. opening the payment interface), getting user purchases, and
creating or modifying subscriptions.

When creating your BillingClient
instance, you’ll need to set a PurchasesUpdatedListener.
This allows your app to receive updates from the In-app Billing API, including
transaction results after the billing flow, as well as purchases completed
outside of your app, e.g. user redeemed a Promo Code or bought a product on
another device.

The following code demonstrates how you could override the onPurchasesUpdated()
method of your PurchasesUpdatedListener:

@Override
void onPurchasesUpdated(@BillingResponse int responseCode,
        List<Purchase> purchases) {
    if (responseCode == BillingResponse.OK
            && purchases != null) {
        for (Purchase purchase : purchases) {
            handlePurchase(purchase);
        }
    } else if (responseCode == BillingResponse.USER_CANCELED) {
        // Handle an error caused by a user canceling the purchase flow.
    } else {
        // Handle any other error codes.
    }
}

You can implement the PurchasesUpdatedListener
in your Activity or in any other class you want, according to your app’s
architecture. And here’s the code for creating the BillingClient
instance, and setting the PurchasesUpdatedListener:

mBillingClient = BillingClient.newBuilder(mContext)
                              .setListener(mPurchasesUpdatedListener)
                              .build();

Listing and selling products

To sell products in your app, first, you need to add them using the Play
Console. For more details about how to add in-app products see the page Administering
In-app Billing
.

Attention: If this is a brand new app, before adding
the products you must publish it to the alpha or beta distribution channel. For
more information, see Draft
Apps are No Longer Supported
.

To get a list of product details with prices for current user, call querySkuDetailsAsync().
You must also specify a listener which implements the SkuDetailsResponseListener
interface. You can then override the onSkuDetailsResponse()
method which notifies the listener when the query finishes, as illustrated by
the following sample code:

List<String> skuList = new ArrayList<> ();
skuList.add("premiumUpgrade");
skuList.add("gas");
SkuDetailsParams.Builder params = SkuDetailsParams.newBuilder();
params.setSkusList(skuList).setType(SkuType.INAPP);
mBillingClient.querySkuDetailsAsync(params.build(),
    new SkuDetailsResponseListener() {
        @Override
        public void onSkuDetailsResponse(SkuDetailsResult result) {
            // Process the result.
        }
    })

After the user chooses a product to buy, you’ll need to start the billing flow
and handle the transaction result. To start a purchase request from your app,
call the launchBillingFlow()
method on the Play Billing Library client. You must call the launchBillingFlow()
method (and all the other methods from BillingClient)
from the UI thread.

The launchBillingFlow()
method needs BillingFlowParams
object that contains relevant data for completing the purchase, such as the
product ID of the item to purchase and the product type (in this case, SkuType.INAPP).
To get an instance of BillingFlowParams,
construct it with newBuilder()
method:

BillingFlowParams.Builder builder = BillingFlowParams
                                       .newBuilder()
                                       .setSku(skuId).setType(SkuType.INAPP);
int responseCode = mBillingClient.launchBillingFlow(builder.build());

As we mentioned earlier, the transaction result will be sent to the onPurchasesUpdated()
method. For details how to process the data received on onPurchasesUpdated()
and how to handle a purchase, check the section Purchase
an item
in our training guide.

Consuming products

By default, all in-app products are managed. It means that Google Play tracks
the product ownership and doesn’t allow to buy multiple times. To be able to buy
a product again, you must consume the product before it becomes available again.

It’s common to implement consumption for in-app products which users may want to
purchase multiple times, such as in-game currency or equipment. You typically
don’t want to implement consumption for in-app products that user purchases once
and provide a permanent effect, such as a premium upgrade.

To consume a product, call the consumeAsync()
method on the Play Billing Library client and pass in the
purchaseToken String value returned when you made the purchase. The
consumption result is returned via onConsumeResponse() method of the ConsumeResponseListener
interface, that you must override to handle the consumption result.

The following example illustrates consuming a product using the associated
purchaseToken:

ConsumeResponseListener listener = new ConsumeResponseListener() {
    @Override
    public void onConsumeResponse(@BillingResponse int responseCode, 
                                  String outToken) {
        if (responseCode == BillingResponse.OK) {
            // Handle the success of the consume operation.
            // For example, increase the number of player's coins,
            // that provide temporary benefits
        }
    }
};
mBillingClient.consumeAsync(purchaseToken, listener);

Sample updated: Trivial Drive V2

With a new library comes a refreshed sample! To help you to understand how to
implement in-app billing in your app using the new Play Billing Library, we’ve
rewritten the Trivial
Drive
sample from the ground up.

Since we released Trivial Drive back in 2013, many new features, devices, and
platforms have been added to the Android ecosystem. To reflect this evolution,
the Trivial
Drive v2
sample now runs on Android TV and Android Wear.

What’s next?

Before integrating within your app, you can try the Play Billing Library with
the codelab published during Google I/O 2017: Buy
and Subscribe: Monetize your app on Google Play
.

In this codelab, you will start with a simplified version of Trivial Drive V2
that lets users to “drive” and then you will add in-app billing to it. You’ll
learn how to integrate purchases and subscriptions as well as the best practices
for developing reliable apps that handle purchases.

Get more info on the Play
Billing Library
and the official
reference
for classes and methods documentation on the Android Developers
website. For a step-by-step guide to implementing the Play Billing Library in
your project, visit the library’s
training class
.

For more details about the Play Billing Library 1.0 release, check out the Releases Notes page, where you can find updates, bug fixes and behavior changes on the library since the Developer Preview release.

We still want your feedback

If you have issues or questions, file a bug
report
on the Google Issue Tracker, and for issues and suggestions on the
sample (like a bug or a new feature), contact us on the Trivial
Drive issues page
.

For technical questions on implementation, library usage, and best practices,
you can use the tags google-play
and play-billing-library
on StackOverflow or visit the communities on our
Google+ page.

Winning the Built-in that Takes Up 40% of the Total Appliances Market in Europe

Winning the Built-in that Takes Up 40% of the Total Appliances Market in Europe

  Did you know that four out of ten refrigerators in the European market are built-in types?   It is a simple yet noteworthy statistic of the